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Perhaps add the Infineon NGC1081 to your IoT coverage

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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 6495
Topic starter  

I just heard about the Infineon NGC1081 device. It is a Battery-Free IoT device.

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PLI/1, Pascal, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
Sure you can learn to be a programmer, it will take the same amount of time for me to learn to be a Doctor.


   
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(@davee)
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Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 1538
 

Hi Ron @zander,

  Infineon describe it as "NFC tag-side controller for smart sensing applications"

  https://www.infineon.com/cms/en/product/power/contactless-power-sensing-ics/nfc-tag-side-controllers/ngc1081/

  At a quick glance at the datasheet, suggests the device is aimed to use either a conventional battery or external power source, or as a NFC (Near Field Communication) powered device, where a powered device like a smartphone with NFC capability, is placed within about 4 cm of the other device, and the phone provides the source of power, as well as a device to exchange data with.

The device is equipped with a number of usual microcontroller interfaces, like analogue to digital converters, etc., as well as NFC to enable contactless communications with suitable devices, including some smartphones.

I guess this could be part of IoT in the right circumstances, but to me, this looks like a rather specialised form of 'battery free.' Perhaps you have an application that would fit this particular scenario.

Best wishes, Dave


   
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(@dronebot-workshop)
Workshop Guru Admin
Joined: 5 years ago
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NFC itself would probably make an interesting subject.

Here is a development kit for the NGC1081.

😎

Bill

This post was modified 6 months ago by DroneBot Workshop

"Never trust a computer you can’t throw out a window." — Steve Wozniak


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 6495
Topic starter  

@davee The part of interest to me was the 'Battery-Free' aspect. I prefer to leave it to Bill to 'interpret' the utility of the device.

What I saw was the following. What caught my attention was both 'Battery-Free' and IoT since Bill mentioned in his last video he was interested in doing more IoT projects.

NGC1081 Development Kit for Battery-Free IoT Devices

Your characterization of the device as an

"NFC tag-side controller for smart sensing applications"

is to dam with faint praise. Leaving out the two facts of IoT and Battery-Free is not what I expect of you. Very dissapointing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PLI/1, Pascal, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
Sure you can learn to be a programmer, it will take the same amount of time for me to learn to be a Doctor.


   
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(@davee)
Member
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 1538
 

Hi Ron @zander,

   You are correct in saying that the phrase is rather faint praise ... but please understand the phrase comes directly from Infineon ... I am only the 'messenger boy' in this case.

It is an interesting device, but one with specific characteristics, compared the 'usual' idea of an IoT microcontroller.

--------

You will see the phrase if you look for the device on the Infineon website, the start of the device's home page at:

which shows: (click on picture to enlarge it)

image

Thus the main 'party trick' of the device, which differentiates it from many more 'conventional' microcontrollers, is that chip can be wired into a position, together with a small coil antenna, unpowered for most of the time. 

Then it will be powered and activated to (say) take a measurement, by a mobile phone or similar device with NFC capability, without making any physical contacts, and upload the measurement result to the phone, all using the same technology that many people use their mobile phone to pay for things.

Best wishes and take care, Dave

P.S. I have just seen Bill's (@dronebot-workshop) comment and thanks Bill for the acknowledgement.

I agree that NFC is an interesting topic in its own right, and maybe this chip and/or its dev kit would be a reasonable starting point.


   
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