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Transition from Arduino to newer chips like a ATTINY1616

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(@kk4ej)
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Joined: 4 years ago
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I have found the Arduino easy to learn and understand the process, using the IDE I have made several projects and now desire to do more, BUT looking at the newer ATTINY chips which are very inexpensive and offer fantastic specs ( memory, USART and assorted pins ) opens up ideas for more projects. Only negative I see is the chips are not offered in DIP packages, but a SOIC adaptor can be hand soldered.

Here is my issue: Im honestly confused on how to move to them for programs. What IDE, what language, but the UPDI programming looks easy enough. Maybe Im missing the simple answer, but I need a nudge in the right direction to start programming these.

I started with PIC chips MANY years ago and never got very far because the language confused me dealing with all the registers and mapping. Along comes arduino and it made sense and Ive had success.

Anyone suggest the next step in learning? Can I stay in the arduino IDE and work on these chips? Platform or another IDE the solution?

Thanks in advance.

Randy

Randy


   
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Inq
 Inq
(@inq)
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Which aspect of these are you most interested... added performance or size?  Or are you specifically want to use this chip only?  I've switched to the Espressif series of chips a decade ago.  They're well established, mature products, have far better specs are 32 bit instead of 8 bit and still use the Arduino IDE for development.  Some changes to Arduino code might be needed, but they're slight and often many libraries can be used without changes.  Even they come in two flavors ESP8266 and ESP32.  I tend to use the ESP8266 as I have found very few IoT applications (except streaming video) need the way more powerful ESP32.  A development board (not just a chip) that includes the USB connector so you can easily hook it up... is about $3 in small quantities.  

"https://www.amazon.com/s?k=wemos+d1+mini&sprefix=wemos%2Caps%2C236"

Spec's vary, but the basics are for the ESP8266 board above

  • Up to 1MB of program space
  • 3 or 15MB of data space
  • 80 or 160 MHz
  • WiFi built in - They make great web servers so you can create apps that you can hook to with you cell phones and any other device on your local network.

The ESP32 has many more pins, same memory, but up to 240 MHz and some even have dual cores if you're really needing horsepower.  It also include Bluetooth.  I want to say the development boards for these are around $7.

3 lines of code = InqPortal = Complete IoT, App, Web Server w/ GUI Admin Client, WiFi Manager, Drag & Drop File Manager, OTA, Performance Metrics, Web Socket Comms, Easy App API, All running on ESP8266...
Even usable on ESP-01S - Quickest Start Guide


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7140
 

Just add the board to the boards' manager and it's the same as an UNO, in fact, the UNO uses one. see the following link, about halfway down is step 3 where it tells you how to do that

https://circuitdigest.com/microcontroller-projects/programming-attiny85-microcontroller-ic-using-arduino#:~:text=To%20program%20the%20ATtiny85%20with ,'&text=After%20that,%20go%20to%20Tools,and%20install%20the%20latest%20version.

 

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
My personal scorecard is now 1 PC hardware fix (circa 1982), 1 open source fix (at age 82), and 2 zero day bugs in a major OS.


   
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(@kk4ej)
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Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 13
Topic starter  

Thanks.   My goal is to use these chips in some RS485 interface projects, one to monitor temperature on geothermal heat pump lines and then some model railroad ideas. Servo motors and signals.

I have these working fine on a pro mini and a nano, but would like to make a better product for the final end. 

Custom circuit boards will complete these.

So if I am understanding correctly, I use the programmer via the UPDI, arrange the pinout for the various chips and program like it is a UNO? I will be working on this soon!

Chips I am looking at starting with: Attiny212, Attiny414 and ATtiny1616. 

Randy


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7140
 

@kk4ej Sorry I have no idea what a UPDI is or for that matter not real sure what a programmer is either. Also, the numbers you are mentioning are nothing like I am aware of. I googled [ATtiny85 programming] and found an Instructables link HERE  but that is for an AtTiny85. I see mention of Atmel and AVR so they are related to Arduino maybe. I also see the Arduino IDE is used.

I am bowing out, I think you are much more knowledgeable than me and I don't want to confuse others who may be following. All the best.

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
My personal scorecard is now 1 PC hardware fix (circa 1982), 1 open source fix (at age 82), and 2 zero day bugs in a major OS.


   
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(@kk4ej)
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Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 13
Topic starter  

@zander Thanks Ron. Its all a learning process and Im just beginning.

These chips are a new group of ATTINY, The UPDI is a single line programming setup using the reset line instead of all the ISP lines we have seen in the past. These chips now have more options than the older ATMEGA, and cheaper to boot. I just ordered several flavors to test, so I hope to have them soon!

Randy


   
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