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Educational models


Ahejazi
(@ahejazi)
Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 5
Topic starter  

Hello Everyone,

I am thinking of building educational models (e.g. human skeleton). The model employs a microcontroller, touch sensors, tft screens, lcd screens, touch sensors and leds. Touch sensors are distributed all over the model. When the students wants to know about a part of the model he/ she touches a sensor then a screen will display information about that part. 
please advise me about the best design, microcontroller, screens. Or a better way to implement such project. 
many thanks


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Will
 Will
(@will)
Prominent Member
Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 817
 

@ahejazi

How about locating a small RFID button at the locations you want to describe. Each will have a unique ID code.

Give people a small hand-held device that they can hold up to the RFID button. The device will use an RFID scanner, read the code from the button, use the code to look up the relevant body part and display the information on the screen. Or, you could also have some pre-recorded WAV files to have the part's information spoken to the user through earphones. That would enable many handicapped people to use your service as well.


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Ahejazi
(@ahejazi)
Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 5
Topic starter  
  1. @will 

    Thank you very much for the suggestions. Both of them are great but the problem is that the model in both cases should be always attended and cannot be displayed for public as a self service. 


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Will
 Will
(@will)
Prominent Member
Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 817
 

@ahejazi 

Why do you assume that I meant for the model to be unattended ?

You'd need someone close by to hand out (and collect) the devices anyway and the RFID buttons could be located on a glass/plastic panel with the model tucked safely behind it.


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DaveE
(@davee)
Estimable Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 162
 

Hi @ahejazi,

  There are an infinite number of possibilities that can 'animate' a model when a switch is closed, including use of (LCD or similar) screens, motors, lights, etc. which is only limited by your imagination, and maybe budget. Obviously simple things like motors and lights can be controlled by an Arduino (with appropriate interfacing), whilst more complex video displays may need more capable processors, such as Raspberry Pi.

However, I am only commenting on a possible switch plus processor combination to detect a visitor touching a switch, as a trigger for such an 'animation'.

Furthermore, I haven't used them myself, so this is only a suggestion for your experimentation, and the product mentioned is just one of the first I found from Google to illustrate the point, so any purchases and circuits you build are at your judgement and risk.

This suggestion assumes you are looking for aa low cost & simple way of putting a number of "touch-to-activate" buttons on an object. The usual China marketplaces are offering these for just a few pence/cents each if you look carefully.

e.g. https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32788411011.html

This appears to require 3 wire connection, power (2.5V-5.5V), ground, and output, and could be connected to an Arduino.

(Note This board can be configured for different output responses, and it includes an onboard LED, which will be helpful when debugging to indicate when the switch has been activated. However, you may need to use a soldering iron to configure it to your needs. Other touch switches may have other options/requirements.)

I would recommend the power and ground to be the same as the Arduino processor power and ground, so that the output pin voltage from the touch switch will be compatible with the Arduino GPIO pin.  (Note 'processor' power, not a higher input voltage reduced by Arduino onboard regulator.)

The output pin could be connected to the GPIO pin of an Arduino. Then, when the pad on the back of the board is touched, the switch should change the state. The Arduino could sense the change of state and instigate any 'animation' you can arrange.

For simplicity, assuming you want to use a number of switches on the same model, I would look for an Arduino with enough GPIO pins to allocate one per switch, plus any pins you need for the 'animation'.

However, if your model has a large number of touch switches, it is also possible to multiplex several switches, by a number of methods, including shift registers - see one of Bill's (as always) excellent blog + videos  https://dronebotworkshop.com/shift-registers/

I hope this helps. Best wishes. Dave


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