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DIY Solder Fume Extractor Questions

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(@voltage)
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I am finally getting close to finishing with adding an air conditioner to my outside shed after cleaning it out and insulating it and replacing the bad boards etc, so I can move all the stuff out of my garage that is in the way but requires temp control or it will go bad. Then I will build me a workbench for my electronics and 3D printers (I may have to build 2) that will have 3 levels. I want/need to add a fume extractor that initially is for soldering fumes but may also come in handy for the 3D printers at some point. Instead of a desktop version that seems to still be unsafe as far as efficiency is concerned, I want to exhaust/extract to the outside. I am thinking a 2" PVC pipe exiting the room in between the 2 work benches at about the 7 foot height. I can add a pipe tee or just a coupling or elbow to hook up the motor on my bench and possibly even add some corrugated tube to connect to the outlet. I found this great idea that I want to use but I will make my own adaptations to my liking. The video is about 5 minutes longer than needed but take a look. 😋 See video below:

So do you think the flow will work out ok with a 3" (80mm) fan or should I adapt and funnel it down so I can use a larger fan?

Thanks,

Dave

Thanks,
Voltage


   
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Will
 Will
(@will)
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@voltage

It looks interesting, but I think you should 3D print the fan shroud and exhaust ports so you can custom make exactly the sizes you want/need without worrying about the available plumbing supplies.

Second, I think you should add a small square frame at the end opposite to the fan so that you can insert a cheap carbon sponge filter. From the sound of it, your new electronics lab will be a lot smaller than your garage and you'll need to clean more of the solder fumes out for the smaller volume.

Third, you already know that 3D printers DO NOT like drafts across them, so I think you should avoid using a fan to suck or push the air out. I think you'd be better enclosing them with just a one-way vent to the outside to let the hot air and noxious smell leave slowly without adding any cold breeze. You could build a 3-sided "closet" and mount the printers vertically inside with each one mounted on a plywood base that uses drawer slides so that you can slide each printer out like a drawer for maintenance, repairs, resupply and so on. Putting a clear plastic "door" to the front would keep all the fumes inside the case and allow you to check progress easily as needed. It would probably reduce the noise levels too.

Please let us know how your project progresses.

I had a psychic girlfriend but she left me before we met.


   
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(@voltage)
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@will Hi Will, you are correct on the 3D printer drafts so that makes my fume extractor even easier to make. I found a 3x3x2 pvc hub and a 3x3x1-1/2 pvc hub and thinking I could 3D print any adapters I may need. As far as the carbon filter I think going with the straight through approach there will be no resistance from the filter and make it better. I was going to completely block off the back of the hub. I want some suction from a distance as much as possible instead of being 1 inch away.

As far as the size of my electronics lab it will be bigger as I am moving stuff out of the way into the smaller outside shed. My garage (big door removed many years ago and replaced with a wall and window) measures 12x25 feet but has a washer and dryer and some computers and an office desk and some canned goods etc  and some other things that can be moved out if necessary. What prompted my attention was I bought this high dollar flux as it is able to be used on brass, copper, nickel AND safe for PCB's.

https://superiorflux.com/products/superior-no-30-soldering-flux/

Then I read the Datasheet. Its named SuperSafe Solder Flux but it needs all the respect as the others. 🤔 

Thanks,
Voltage


   
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Will
 Will
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@voltage 

Sounds like a great space for your lab !

I had a psychic girlfriend but she left me before we met.


   
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(@voltage)
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@will Too bad it's been taking so long to get to this point. If I just won the lottery I could air condition my big work shop. 😀 

Thanks,
Voltage


   
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Will
 Will
(@will)
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@voltage 

Ah yes ... if wishes were fishes ... 

If you won the Powerball you could outdo Edison's lab 🙂

I had a psychic girlfriend but she left me before we met.


   
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(@voltage)
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@will Too many hobbies . . . Not enough time. 😀 But so far I know, I will never be bored. You always read about people that retire and don't know what to do with themselves. Not a problem I will ever have. 😋 But on the big workshop, I wouldn't have such a nice large shop if I would have built it with AC in the original plans. But eventually I will partition maybe 1/3 of it into climate controlled space, after the recession. 😕 

Thanks,
Voltage


   
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Will
 Will
(@will)
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@voltage 

Or maybe put a bucket inside your solder fume extractor and fill it with dry ice. The breeze across the top the bucket will be cooled by the dry ice and lower your ambient temperature. Best of all, it won't introduce any extra moisture into the air.

I had a psychic girlfriend but she left me before we met.


   
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(@voltage)
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@will I didn't realize dry ice was that readily available and inexpensive. WalMart even sells it. But I have air conditioning in my garage where I am setting up the electronics/3d printer lab so I am good there. That would be a large fume extractor to hold a bucket of dry ice on my work bench. 😋 

Thanks,
Voltage


   
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(@voltage)
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Well after some research I think I have decided I need to go with a centrifugal blower for best results as far as pushing air through a duct (pvc pipes). I did see some axial fans that could easily be adapted to my scheme on ebay, but trying to figure what the suction would be based on the CFM's with the pipe being smaller on the output doesn't look promising. Example of ebay fan below. So I will experiment and study this for a good bit before I buy anything so it has the greatest chance of being a winner.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/353835361081?hash=item52623b2339:g:blQAAOSwSy5gpIMP

https://www.ebay.com/itm/294831263978?epid=24031744959&hash=item44a55010ea:g:p10AAOSwq41d3ntb

https://www.ebay.com/itm/193530651966?hash=item2d0f53653e:g:kEwAAOSwKJhhZVi4

 

Or my thoughts except this is a double that could be modded and have spare parts:

https://www.surpluscenter.com/Electrical/Blowers-Fans/AC-Centrifugal-Blowers/160-CFM-115-Volt-AC-Dual-Blower-16-1549.axd

 

Thoughts?

Thanks,
Voltage


   
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(@voltage)
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I know, I'm slow at things because I am working on too many things at all times. Then throw in some health surprises to slow me down a little and now a progress report. My solder fume extractor is basically done. I just have to cut a hole in the wall with a 4 1/4" hole saw and add a vent to connect it. Here is a link to a slideshow to show what I made using a draft inducer from a furnace.

Solder Fume extractor

Thanks,
Voltage


   
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