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Powering big stepper (Nema 23) motor with li-ion battery.


rimshot609
(@rimshot609)
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I'm trying to power a Nema 23 stepper motor (114mm) and CNC driver with a li-ion battery (see specs below). I'm concerned about the MAH of the battery and if this arrangement will damage the motor or the driver? I will be using an Arduino to control the motor.

 

Motor: Nema 23 CNC Stepper Motor 
Driver: CNC driver: 1.0-4.2A 20-50VDC 1/128 Micro-Step Resolutions
Battery: 36V 10AH 10S3P 10000MAH li-Ion battery

 


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rimshot609
(@rimshot609)
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Joined: 6 months ago
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Topic starter  

So, I connected everything just like the instructions here: Big Stepper Motors

and I got a spark from the motor driver when connecting the ground (positive was connected first). I quickly removed the ground wire. Hopefully, I haven't damaged anything. Is this normal?


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Melbul
(@melbul)
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Joined: 9 months ago
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Surely you would wire and test the circuit before connecting the power supply?

if that is what you have done and the spark happened as you connected the power supply, then it would be a normal connection spark. I would advise connecting the positive/live power connection last and if possible use a power switch rather than just wires.


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rimshot609
(@rimshot609)
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Joined: 6 months ago
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Topic starter  

@melbul I have no idea how to test the circuit before connecting the power supply. I'm new to this and trying to learn. I've watched many videos but please do tell me how I test the circuit.

FYI, I have connected a switch in between the ground connection of the driver and battery. The spark was brief and I am able to run the motor. Although, it is making a pretty loud high pitched noise.  

Also, I thought you should always connect ground last? Am I wrong about this?

Thanks.


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Melbul
(@melbul)
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Joined: 9 months ago
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@rimshot609

i would always look to connect the live/positive power connection last. That is why most power switches are fitted on the live supply.

use a multimeter to test continuity and for short circuits before powering up your circuits.

A multimeter is one of your first necessities when getting started, it doesn’t need to be an expensive one.

 

 


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rimshot609
(@rimshot609)
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@melbul

Thanks for the assistance and tips. I was able to test for continuity and after adjusting the sketch, the motor is running smooth now. 


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