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Using the Arduino IDE

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(@rwilkinson38)
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Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 4
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This seems to be autosaving the sketch to the harddrive by itself. When I am testing code and then reload the original sketch the test code is there. Is there a way to turn auto save off.


   
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(@rwilkinson38)
Member
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 4
Topic starter  

Forgot to say I am using IDE 2.3.2 and it is a UNO R4 WIFI, It seems that when I upload to the board it saves the file for me... I don't like that

Any suggestions 


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 6827
 

@rwilkinson38 That is the way most people work, but always check the Preferences if you want different behaviour. I take it you are a noob.

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
Sure you can learn to be a programmer, it will take the same amount of time for me to learn to be a Doctor.


   
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(@rwilkinson38)
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Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 4
Topic starter  

Thanks, and that is with a capital Noob

 


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 6827
 

@rwilkinson38 We all were at some point, mine just happens to be in a totally different era, 1959.

You should let the IDE save the file, bad stuff can happen if you don't. If you want to preserve the state of the project prior to making some changes, set up a procedure (I used to have a batch file) that makes a zip file of the entire project directory date and time stamped down to the min or even sec level. After you have a few maybe delete the older or not, your choice.

There are other solutions used by professional programmers but that is overkill for now at least. I am on a Mac most of the time (I have a total of 5 OSes on 4 machines) and haven't figured out how to do that but my Mac friend just gave me a tool.

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
Sure you can learn to be a programmer, it will take the same amount of time for me to learn to be a Doctor.


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 6827
 

@rwilkinson38 If I am making changes to code but am not sure it's right, I do a copy/paste (Ctl-C/Ctl-V) then // comment out the original lines and now modify the lines you just copied. If you watch an old pro like me doing it I can do it faster than explain it.

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
Sure you can learn to be a programmer, it will take the same amount of time for me to learn to be a Doctor.


   
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(@yurkshirelad)
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Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 493
 

If you’re worried about making changes and breaking something, copy the whole source file and paste it onto Notepad or Notepad++. The latter is a brilliant application as it remembers stuff you paste in, even if you don’t save it. You can close and reopen Notepad++ and it remembers everything.


   
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