Advanced Sensor Cal...
 
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Advanced Sensor Calibration

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(@pugwash)
Sorcerers' Apprentice
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 923
Topic starter  

I have just watched the latest video on colour sensors and an idea occurred to me for a part 2 video.

Back in the 70s when I worked in a steel chemistry lab, we would calibrate our spectrographs twice per shift. This was done using two pots per element/channel. Fundamentally, calibrating sensors to measure the intensity of colours at specific wavelengths.

I was thinking about using two pots per colour channel, pot 1 would shift the whole range up or down and pot 2 to expand or contract the range. This, of course, could be done with just two pots and a channel stepper. Just to make it even more complex ? 

But this principle, being the basic principle of almost all calibration methods, would not just be restricted to colour sensors but could be applied in other measurement systems.


   
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(@pugwash)
Sorcerers' Apprentice
Joined: 5 years ago
Posts: 923
Topic starter  

On pondering about this further, maybe a rotary encoder would be the better choice than pots, at least you could use the push button interrupt to change the colour channel.

And storing the calibration values in the EEPROM, might also be a better solution than manually altering the code used for measurement.


   
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(@anibal)
Member
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 39
 

Good Morning 

Pugwash:

Your comments about the color sensor calibration is of special interest to me in particular and your comments are very much appreciated, welcome and well timed. I have yet to see the video but will as soon as I’m finished with this reply.

The  project I have in mind uses spectroscopy as its main technique to achieve its goal would necessarily require calibration and you suggested use of rotary encoder and interrupts and eeprom to retain data will be a logical and  tried and true effective use of consonants. Judging from what I have learned watching DB videos on encoders and eeprom your suggestion is right on. 

Best,

Anibal 


   
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