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Spot Soldering for Artzy Projrects

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(@gtmize)
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I’m trying to duplicate spot soldering to build Artzy things.  I cannot seem to hold a bead of solder on my Iron to apply to each component ( resistor, transistor..)   Is the type of solder, temperature, flux ? sites like Apour Maker


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 6827
 

Posted by: @gtmize

I’m trying to duplicate spot soldering to build Artzy things.  I cannot seem to hold a bead of solder on my Iron to apply to each component ( resistor, transistor..)   Is the type of solder, temperature, flux ? sites like Apour Maker

Is that two questions?

The first being how to 'hold' a bead of solder? I have a special tip for that which has a concave surface that holds quite a large bead.

Is the second question related to what kind of solder, temperature and flux are best for soldering parts? The answer is 63/37 solder 600F to 650 F and proper flux. I use mostly liquid but if you can find NON fake paste then that is good too. It doesn't last long even if kept in the refrigerator to prolong it's life.

 

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
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Sure you can learn to be a programmer, it will take the same amount of time for me to learn to be a Doctor.


   
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(@gtmize)
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@zander Thanks .. Maybe it just takes practice 🤨


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 6827
 

@gtmize Was I right about two questions?

For non artsy use, otherwise known as normal soldering, you do NOT apply solder to the tip, you use the tip to heat the joint (where 2 or more metal parts are joined) then push the solder against the hot parts. It works almost instantly if you use liquid flux and thin solder. I have 0.38mm 63Sn/37Pb with 2.2% flux core for tiny parts like resistor or capacitor leads and of course some pins. Then I have 0.8mm for larger things. It is 60Sn/40Pb with 1.5% - 2.0% flux.

I don't know what your artsy application or technique is, but if you really need a large ball of solder, then get a point with a concave tip. I have a couple, I use them for soldering surface mount devices.

Perhaps you can tell me more or show some pictures of your art work.

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
Sure you can learn to be a programmer, it will take the same amount of time for me to learn to be a Doctor.


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 6827
 

@gtmize I forgot, yes, it does take practice, but you can by solder practice boards. Have a look at this one https://amz.run/8kko

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
Sure you can learn to be a programmer, it will take the same amount of time for me to learn to be a Doctor.


   
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