Notifications
Clear all

[Solved] Proper Power Supply for automotive application

3 Posts
2 Users
0 Likes
122 Views
(@rebeljd)
Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 16
Topic starter  

I'm considering using an ESP32 or Arduino in an automotive application to monitor engine parameters and control some auxiliary functions.  I know that I'll need protection from EMI interference and from voltage spikes from motors (including the starter motor), relays, etc.  And perhaps from electrostatic discharge.  I'm not overly concerned about environmental conditions as it will be in the interior which is climate controlled.   

Does anyone have any recommendations, experience, or example with this type of application.  Thanks in advance for any help.

JD

This topic was modified 2 months ago by RebelJD

   
Quote
Topic Tags
Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 6827
 

Posted by: @rebeljd

I'm considering using an ESP32 or Arduino in an automotive application to monitor engine parameters and control some auxiliary functions.  I know that I'll need protection from EMI interference and from voltage spikes from motors (including the starter motor), relays, etc.  And perhaps from electrostatic discharge.  I'm not overly concerned about environmental conditions as it will be in the interior which is climate controlled.   

Does anyone have any recommendations, experience, or example with this type of application.  Thanks in advance for any help.

JD

I haven't done any projects involving cars, but I did a bunch with an RV. It is the same technology except for the starter issues. The easiest solution is to use 18650 type batteries (or bigger form factor) in a UPS board so the car will recharge the batteries. The 18650 in LiFePO4 chemistry is extremely safe but capacity is about 1/2 of the more common LiFe (fixed by using another series pair in parallel). LiPo is also a possibility but you need a balance charger. The LiFePO4 also needs a special charger but it is different from the LiPo. I have both and can send you links to products that are safe and perform well.

WARNING: If you live in an environment where the temperature gets low enough (different for each chemistry) you will need to add some sort of BMS so you do not charge or discharge the batteries below (and above) certain temps. I used LiFePO4 chemistry and the temperatures there are do NOT charge below 24F/-4C and do NOT discharge below -4F/-20C. There are similar conditions for heat, it is advised to shut down the battery at 135F/57C. A decent BMS can handle all that, just don't expect a $5 BMS to work as well as a $50 BMS. Since these batteries can explode and/or catch fire, it is a bad idea to go cheap on the safety device.

Let me know if I can be of further help with any of the hardware.

 

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
Sure you can learn to be a programmer, it will take the same amount of time for me to learn to be a Doctor.


   
ReplyQuote
(@rebeljd)
Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 16
Topic starter  

Thanks, I've decided to use a standalone 12v to 5v DC to DC converter with built in surge and noise suppression. I'll be using a TVS on the 12v supply from the battery.  I'm going to run the inputs and outputs thru opto isolation.   I really didn't want to add batteries since there is already a battery in the system.

 


   
ReplyQuote