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quiz game

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The apprentice
(@the-apprentice)
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Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 67
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Good day

I was wondering if it is possible to make a console that can work like a game show. How and what do I need to handle the buttons. Say if a question is asked and the player pushes the button first.(This must be wireless) The console must recognize who was first and maybe switch on a light. I was thinking of Blue tooth, and then why not use WIFI. I will need to have a score card and for this I was thinking of using a 8x8 LED matrix. So the console must be able to display this as well. Will a Arduino do all this or should I use something else. Where do I start 🤔 Is it at all possible with a micro controller. 


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7334
 

@the-apprentice Almost any MPU or MCU can do that, but it will depend on how many buttons, displays and any other elements since some boards have more pins than others. As far as wireless, yes WiFi has about 3X tha range of bluetooth.

I would compare the ESP32 vs the PICOW vs a Pi Zero. What resources do you need (WiFi, x pins for x buttons similarly for displays) I think you will find all those boards are capable, so the cost will become a factor. Depending on where you live, the PICOW goes for $6, a Pi Zero roughly $20 and ESP32 for a few dollars each if ordered from China.

Have fun.

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
My personal scorecard is now 1 PC hardware fix (circa 1982), 1 open source fix (at age 82), and 2 zero day bugs in a major OS.


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7334
 

@the-apprentice  First do a google of 'arduino quiz game' and you will get lots of ideas.

Here are a few LINK LINK LINK LINK LINK 

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
My personal scorecard is now 1 PC hardware fix (circa 1982), 1 open source fix (at age 82), and 2 zero day bugs in a major OS.


   
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The apprentice
(@the-apprentice)
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Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 67
Topic starter  

@zander Thanks.


   
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(@slowcat)
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Joined: 4 months ago
Posts: 2
 

Posted by: @the-apprentice

Good day

I was wondering if it is possible to make a console that can work like a game show. How and what do I need to handle the buttons. Say if a question is asked and the player pushes the button first.(This must be wireless) The console must recognize who was first and maybe switch on a light. I was thinking of Blue tooth, and then why not use WIFI. I will need to have a score card and for this I was thinking of using a 8x8 LED matrix. So the console must be able to display this as well. Will a Arduino do all this or should I use something else. Where do I start 🤔 Is it at all possible with a micro controller. 

I have made a project like this using 4 esp01s for the buttons and an esp32 for the master controller. 

 


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7334
 

@slowcat @the-apprentice Sounds perfect. The only other thing needed is some sort of scoreboard, the esp32 can handle all that easily.

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
My personal scorecard is now 1 PC hardware fix (circa 1982), 1 open source fix (at age 82), and 2 zero day bugs in a major OS.


   
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The apprentice
(@the-apprentice)
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Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 67
Topic starter  

@slowcat What was the cost when your project was completed?


   
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The apprentice
(@the-apprentice)
Member
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 67
Topic starter  

Good day

I have moved to the counter. I have used the tutorial Bob gave on the 7 seg display but can not get the ELS2305RDB to work. Any suggestion's on how to get it running from an separate power supply? I think the UNO don't have the punch. 

ELS2305RDB

1 Digit Numeric LED Display • 7Seg • 56.7mm • Red • IV= 300µcd • Black Face • Common Cathode

   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7334
 

@the-apprentice Yes, use a seperate power supply.

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
My personal scorecard is now 1 PC hardware fix (circa 1982), 1 open source fix (at age 82), and 2 zero day bugs in a major OS.


   
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The apprentice
(@the-apprentice)
Member
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 67
Topic starter  

@zander Thanks but where do the wires go. This is new for me. 🤔


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7334
 

@the-apprentice Just remove the power wires that are currently connecting the device to the UNO Gnd and 5V to the same connections on the external power supply.

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
My personal scorecard is now 1 PC hardware fix (circa 1982), 1 open source fix (at age 82), and 2 zero day bugs in a major OS.


   
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(@davee)
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Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 1765
 

Hi Ron @zander and @the-apprentice,

  Sorry, I am completely in the dark as to what is going on here, but the conversation above leads me to have some niggling doubts.

  I tried looking for the LED data sheet, but what I found was a confusing mess. I have the impression it is one that relies on external resistors to control the current. If that is the case, then to make sense of this discussion, I would need to see a sketch of the wiring, including resistor values, etc., plus a link to the appropriate data sheet.

Whilst it is feasible a 2nd power source is needed, the first problem is often the limited current output capability of the Arduino processor GPIOs. Again, this needs the same circuit sketch, etc. to verify.

In addition, if there are two power supplies involved, they will need a common ground, probably using a star point topology, with careful wiring to ensure the current flows along the correct paths.

Best wishes, Dave


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7334
 

@davee @the-apprentice I also couldn't find any useful datasheets. Since it sounds like he has already hooked it up, he will know where the device G and VCC pins are.

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
My personal scorecard is now 1 PC hardware fix (circa 1982), 1 open source fix (at age 82), and 2 zero day bugs in a major OS.


   
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(@davee)
Member
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 1765
 

Hi Ron @zander,

   @the-apprentice says:

" I have used the tutorial Bob gave on the 7 seg display but can not get the ELS2305RDB to work."

You know I always tend to the cynical view, but perhaps you can appreciate why that does not inspire confidence that your suggestion "Since it sounds like he has already hooked it up, he will know where the device G and VCC pins are" is justified.

Buying parts from unknown suppliers is always a risk, but when the parts do not even have data sheets from the original designers/manufacturers, we are guessing in total darkness.

In addition, there are a number of alternate ways 7-segment displays may be driven, with a wide range of voltage and current demands. The circuit is required to understand which arrangement has been chosen.

Sorry, but my patience in trying to 2nd guess situations like this, is very thin. 

I wish @the-apprentice and the project well, but unless reliable information sources can be traced, I do not feel it is worth pursuing in the present form. Components like LED 7-segment displays, with decent datasheets, from have been available for decades.

Best wishes, Dave


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7334
 

@the-apprentice Who is Bob. As always, provide a link to any code or diagram or article you are referring to, there are no mind readers here.

I have moved to the counter. I have used the tutorial Bob gave on the 7 seg

I assumed (perhaps erroneously) that you tried it with the UNO only to find out the UNO doesn't have enough power, can you tell us if that is true or not?

 

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
My personal scorecard is now 1 PC hardware fix (circa 1982), 1 open source fix (at age 82), and 2 zero day bugs in a major OS.


   
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