Arduino Uno Hall Ef...
 
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Arduino Uno Hall Effect magnet proximity indicator using 10 LEDs.

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AV8R-Guy
(@av8r-guy)
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Joined: 2 years ago
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@will, hmmm.  Getting ahold of those two modules doesn’t appear to be as easy as I hoped.  You you know where I can get them?  I saw his schematic.  Are people expected to build them, or can a guy buy them already made?


   
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Will
 Will
(@will)
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Joined: 3 years ago
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@av8r-guy 

Sorry, I don't know anything about the project, I was just Googling for a project that used an Arduino and a sensor and displayed out to an LED array; hoping to find the one you wanted.

He includes a PCB layout, so you could, theoretically either make one yourself or duplicate the circuit on some design site like EasyEDA and JLCPCB. Not a suitable task for a first project.

However, it'd probably be easier to just build up the circuit from the Arduino, Hall sensor and loose LEDs and write software around those parts. Make it on a breadboard (or two) and then make a permanent case for it after you know how much room you'll need.

You can probably get a lot of help here if you want to make it yourself. I would suggest that you start with a real Arduino though, the author uses an ATMEGA chip and adds support components to simulate one. You'll experience a lot less pain and a lot more help if you start with working Arduino because much of the wiring will be considered trustworthy 🙂

 

Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're talking about.


   
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Will
 Will
(@will)
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@av8r-guy 

I found what may be a suitable (and inexpensive and easily available) substitute for the hall effect sensor. Go to Amazon and search for "3144E Hall Effect Sensor".

It also shows two outputs D0 and A0 which indicates that it will output either a digital ON/OFF (via sensor pin marked D0) or an analog value (via sensor pin marked A0).

I don't know if the distribution is as smooth as the AD22151 used in the original article.

From there it's just determining the sensor's range, dividing it up into suitable segments (left and right) and powering up the appropriate LEDs.

Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're talking about.


   
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