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Single receiver controller board

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(@rezafar)
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Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 6
Topic starter  

Hello everyone I am new to the group and also new in robotics and could use some advice. 

I am trying to build an educational prototype that will be based on a single controller board for a 4WD RC car from scratch.  I’ve already purchased the breadboard and some of the basic components except the essential pieces.

For the receiver I plan to use an ATMEGA-328p microcontroller, two L293D motor driver, Bluetooth Module X1, IR Proximity Sensor X3, and Impact detector switch X2 to run on Mecanum wheels for this model that will be able to move in all directions.   The intention is to assemble a “SINGLE” controller board that will also give me the speed I need.

1) Are the microcontroller, motor driver, and other components mentioned above suitable?

2) What configuration will help me get to speed of up to 10 to 12 miles per hour moving forward/backward and speed of 5 to 7 miles per hour moving left/right?

3) What additional parts do I need for this?

I appreciate your time and guidance.


   
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Inq
 Inq
(@inq)
Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 1900
 

Welcome to the forum.

I see the biggest trouble with your selection is Bluetooth.  Do you realize it's only good for about 30 feet??? You'd have to run pretty fast to keep up with it.  😆 

I'd suggest going with an ESP32... WiFi's and BT built in and it's a dual-core running at 240MHz instead of the Arduino 328P at 16MHz and no WiFi or BT.

VBR,

Inq

3 lines of code = InqPortal = Complete IoT, App, Web Server w/ GUI Admin Client, WiFi Manager, Drag & Drop File Manager, OTA, Performance Metrics, Web Socket Comms, Easy App API, All running on ESP8266...
Even usable on ESP-01S - Quickest Start Guide


   
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Inq
 Inq
(@inq)
Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 1900
 

More on the motors - I hope someone with more experience will chime in, but most of the "toy" motors with gears typically top out speed wise at around 2 mph.  Without the gears, the motors aren't strong enough to get things moving.  By the time you get motors capable of those speeds (with/without gears) you're looking at pretty substantial motors... that require bigger drives and bigger power sources.  You might need to look into the RC car catalogs as those brushless motors and gear sets that can get you about any speed range you can imagine.  But you're talking about specialized brushless ESC controller to drive them.  However these ESC's can be easily controlled using PWM from any ESP32 or Arduino.  

Good luck.

VBR,

Inq

3 lines of code = InqPortal = Complete IoT, App, Web Server w/ GUI Admin Client, WiFi Manager, Drag & Drop File Manager, OTA, Performance Metrics, Web Socket Comms, Easy App API, All running on ESP8266...
Even usable on ESP-01S - Quickest Start Guide


   
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Inq
 Inq
(@inq)
Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 1900
 

Posted by: @inq

I'd suggest going with an ESP32... WiFi's and BT built in and it's a dual-core running at 240MHz instead of the Arduino 328P at 16MHz and no WiFi or BT.

Forgot to add... WiFi should be good for a range of about a couple of hundred feet with direct line of site.  Also... the ESP32 with WiFi will be about the same price as an Arduino UNO.  You can control it with a second ESP32 or if you're willing to take on a challenge, you could drive it with a cell phone through a web interface on any device iPhone or Android.  Just a thought.

 

3 lines of code = InqPortal = Complete IoT, App, Web Server w/ GUI Admin Client, WiFi Manager, Drag & Drop File Manager, OTA, Performance Metrics, Web Socket Comms, Easy App API, All running on ESP8266...
Even usable on ESP-01S - Quickest Start Guide


   
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(@rezafar)
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Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 6
Topic starter  

@inq 

Thanks so much for your suggestion


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7287
 

@rezafar Since you didn't fill out your profile with number of years experience both software and electronics, it's hard to judge. IF you are new to both, then that is quite the challenge since you must design it all yourself, and that is a much higher education level.

I suggest you first build Bills (dronebot-workshop) mecanum car. There is a video and an article that goes into the details.

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
My personal scorecard is now 1 PC hardware fix (circa 1982), 1 open source fix (at age 82), and 2 zero day bugs in a major OS.


   
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(@rezafar)
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Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 6
Topic starter  

@zander 

Hi Ron, thanks for your feedback.  I majored in computer science and currently doing Database consulting and familiar with C++ and some Python.  Most of my digital design exposure was in college and your point is well taken.  I have an friend who is also helping me and he has more experience with electronics and digital design.  In any case, please do share any thoughts or recommendation that you may have.  


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7287
 

@rezafar Great, we often get guys that just retired as gravediggers and expect to be professional programmers in 10 days or less. It sounds like you are in good shape, especially with the suggestions you have been given. Ditch the UNO, get an esp32, forget BT, maybe even WiFi, check out ESP-NOW (Bill has a video/article).

When done be sure to show it off in the 'Show and Tell' sub-forum of the Project Corner forum.

Good luck.

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
My personal scorecard is now 1 PC hardware fix (circa 1982), 1 open source fix (at age 82), and 2 zero day bugs in a major OS.


   
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(@rezafar)
Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 6
Topic starter  

Hi All,

What type/model of reasonably priced DC motor (brushed/brushless) do I need to build a robot that has 4 omni wheels, weights about 3 lbs., it's fairly fast, and it is powered by a 12v 3s Lipo 5200mhA?

 

Thanks,


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7287
 

@rezafar LiPo chemistry is 3.7V per cell so a 3S is 11.1V. I have the same battery. Most who want/need 12V for a motor get a 4S or 14.8V and use a buck converter to bring it down to 12V. I always prefer brushless, an average sized one should suffice.

 

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
My personal scorecard is now 1 PC hardware fix (circa 1982), 1 open source fix (at age 82), and 2 zero day bugs in a major OS.


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7287
 

@rezafar I forgot to add, you will need a proper charger from a reliable supplier. I get mine from SkyRC. If you are using 'bag' batteries, a B6 Mini is what you need for LiPo as they use balance leads.

If it's one of those larger bricks, then something like a B6 Neo at least, bigger if you want multi battery etc. Total for both is under $100.

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
My personal scorecard is now 1 PC hardware fix (circa 1982), 1 open source fix (at age 82), and 2 zero day bugs in a major OS.


   
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