Notifications
Clear all

Platform IO Core With CLion

11 Posts
3 Users
4 Likes
321 Views
TK-PlasticIntoPurpose
(@tk-plasticintopurpose)
Active Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 6
Topic starter  

Hello Programmers, 

Here is my problem: I NEED 1 editer / IDE for embedded programming + higher-level software engineering. All of my code will be in C / C++.  I love the CLion IDE (costs a lot tho) I love MVSC (free) I love MacOS (Apple Silicon). 

Which / what is the most powerful or best way to program C / C++ on MacOS? 

 

I have and most likely will use Platform IO Core (any other ideas?) wether or not I use visual studio code or CLion. However, I can not find the PATH to Platform IO Core...CLion wants a path, and I can't find it. I installed PIO with homebrew. 

 

Anything helps! Thanks!

 

P.S. What do the "real" companies use for programming MCU's? There is no way they use Arduino...They must be running something like AVR studio...??

This topic was modified 6 months ago 2 times by TK-PlasticIntoPurpose

   
Quote
frogandtoad
(@frogandtoad)
Noble Member
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 1478
 

@tk-plasticintopurpose

Posted by: @tk-plasticintopurpose

Hello Programmers, 

Here is my problem: I NEED 1 editer / IDE for embedded programming + higher-level software engineering. All of my code will be in C / C++.  I love the CLion IDE (costs a lot tho) I love MVSC (free) I love MacOS (Apple Silicon). 

Which / what is the most powerful or best way to program C / C++ on MacOS? 

 

I have and most likely will use Platform IO Core (any other ideas?) wether or not I use visual studio code or CLion. However, I can not find the PATH to Platform IO Core...CLion wants a path, and I can't find it. I installed PIO with homebrew. 

 

Anything helps! Thanks!

 

P.S. What do the "real" companies use for programming MCU's? There is no way they use Arduino...They must be running something like AVR studio...??

I don't know what "real" companies use for programming MCU's, but I have used "eclipse", which is a fully fledged IDE for all types of programming languages, and I have successfully used it for embedded programming of the Arduino, as well as full on standalone C++ projects, including Java etc... choose the plugins and language you need, and it works quite well.

Here is a a couple of screen shots of mine compiling and running a simple Arduino project:

2432 Eclipse 1

 

2433 Eclipse 2

Maybe worth looking into, especially because it's free!

Cheers


   
ReplyQuote
Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Famed Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 3432
 

@tk-plasticintopurpose Choosing an IDE is a matter of preference usually borne out of substantial experience. I am unsure what your last statement means, Arduino is the name of a company.

P.S. What do the "real" companies use for programming MCU's? There is no way they use Arduino...They must be running something like AVR studio...??

Not sure what help we can be to you.

I just found your website. Good luck.

"Don't tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do and let them surprise you with their results.” - G.S. Patton, Gen. USA
"Never wrestle with a pig....the pig loves it and you end up covered in mud..." anon


   
ReplyQuote
TK-PlasticIntoPurpose
(@tk-plasticintopurpose)
Active Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 6
Topic starter  

@frogandtoad Thanks!

 

After I gain more experience, I will be able to choose more wisely. For now, I will probably use VSC with the PIO plugin! 

P.S. What would someone like Kitchen Aid use for programming their high-end toasters? Kind of a weird question but just wondering what the difference is between DIY Arduino projects and the "real world." Thanks!


   
ReplyQuote
TK-PlasticIntoPurpose
(@tk-plasticintopurpose)
Active Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 6
Topic starter  
Posted by: @zander

@tk-plasticintopurpose Choosing an IDE is a matter of preference usually borne out of substantial experience. I am unsure what your last statement means, Arduino is the name of a company.

P.S. What do the "real" companies use for programming MCU's? There is no way they use Arduino...They must be running something like AVR studio...??

Not sure what help we can be to you.

I just found your website. Good luck.

Thanks!


   
ReplyQuote
frogandtoad
(@frogandtoad)
Noble Member
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 1478
 

@tk-plasticintopurpose

Posted by: @tk-plasticintopurpose

@frogandtoad Thanks!

 

After I gain more experience, I will be able to choose more wisely. For now, I will probably use VSC with the PIO plugin! 

P.S. What would someone like Kitchen Aid use for programming their high-end toasters? Kind of a weird question but just wondering what the difference is between DIY Arduino projects and the "real world." Thanks!

I'd like to help, but unfortunately I'm unable to answer those questions, as I'm not a professional embedded programmer... just a hobbyist in this space.

Good  luck with your projects.


   
ReplyQuote
TK-PlasticIntoPurpose
(@tk-plasticintopurpose)
Active Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 6
Topic starter  

@frogandtoad I understand! Not really a very important question, just wanted to know what a career might look like in that area!


   
frogandtoad reacted
ReplyQuote
frogandtoad
(@frogandtoad)
Noble Member
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 1478
 

@tk-plasticintopurpose

Posted by: @tk-plasticintopurpose

@frogandtoad I understand! Not really a very important question, just wanted to know what a career might look like in that area!

I've worked in IT for many years doing a whole lot of programming, networking, application support, automation etc.  Over time you'll settle down with the tools you feel most comfortable with, but the job may also dictate to you which tools you MUST use - It all depends on the shop.  One things for sure however, is that these roles are usually very demanding, but also rewarding in many ways.

Cheers.


   
ReplyQuote
TK-PlasticIntoPurpose
(@tk-plasticintopurpose)
Active Member
Joined: 7 months ago
Posts: 6
Topic starter  
Posted by: @frogandtoad

@tk-plasticintopurpose

Posted by: @tk-plasticintopurpose

@frogandtoad I understand! Not really a very important question, just wanted to know what a career might look like in that area!

I've worked in IT for many years doing a whole lot of programming, networking, application support, automation etc.  Over time you'll settle down with the tools you feel most comfortable with, but the job may also dictate to you which tools you MUST use - It all depends on the shop.  One things for sure however, is that these roles are usually very demanding, but also rewarding in many ways.

Cheers.

 

Yes!


   
ReplyQuote
Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Famed Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 3432
 

@frogandtoad Another thing I don't see mentioned a lot is when I started in IT (IS back then) there were 300 people in just the head office admin, several hundred more in manufacturing and software development lab. Now the 300 people are all gone, either off shore or outsourced, the plant is gone, not sure about the lab. This was a fortune 5 company. My point being, be careful when speaking of 'a career', survival is more like it and may not be the wisest career choice unless you live in the place that is doing the work now for 1/10 the price.

"Don't tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do and let them surprise you with their results.” - G.S. Patton, Gen. USA
"Never wrestle with a pig....the pig loves it and you end up covered in mud..." anon


   
ReplyQuote
frogandtoad
(@frogandtoad)
Noble Member
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 1478
 

@zander

Posted by: @zander

@frogandtoad Another thing I don't see mentioned a lot is when I started in IT (IS back then) there were 300 people in just the head office admin, several hundred more in manufacturing and software development lab. Now the 300 people are all gone, either off shore or outsourced, the plant is gone, not sure about the lab. This was a fortune 5 company. My point being, be careful when speaking of 'a career', survival is more like it and may not be the wisest career choice unless you live in the place that is doing the work now for 1/10 the price.

Indeed!  In my last workplace (large financial) there were ~3,000 people in the building, and many of them were and still are overseas contractors. The one constant is regular restructures every 12 to 18 months, and you have to be prepared to move around a lot and skill up, time and time again in areas of expertise new to you, but that's how you learn and get experience, so it's not all bad.

Cheers.


   
Ron reacted
ReplyQuote