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Arduino Nano Every  


zephyr
(@zephyr)
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The Nano is one of the newest Arduino boards and has many desirable features. It costs less than the Uno has more IO pins (including more analog inputs and a total of 4 serial IO ports). There are advanced features such as a built-in analog voltage comparator, event system that lets you configure peripheral events to trigger interrupts and configurable custom logic.

The configurable custom logic could be a follow-up to the program that used external logic gates with Arduino.


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DroneBot Workshop
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There are a lot of very cool modules in the new Arduino Nano series, I have been experimenting with the Arduino Nano 33 IoT board for an upcoming video and article.

I would certainly consider the Nano Every board if there is enough interest, I had also considered the Arduino Nano 33 BLE with Sense board.

😎

Bill

"Never trust a computer you can’t throw out a window." — Steve Wozniak


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Robert T.
(@roborobs)
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@dronebot-workshop does the Arduino Nano Every board include builtin wifi or bluetooth?

Robert T.
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"In the storms of your life may your heart soar like the eagle." ~ Unknown Author


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DroneBot Workshop
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@roborobs

Hi Robert

 

No, the Every board does not include any type of radio communications.  The Nano 33 IoT board that I am currently working with includes both WiFi and Bluetooth.

😎

Bill

This post was modified 3 months ago 2 times by DroneBot Workshop

"Never trust a computer you can’t throw out a window." — Steve Wozniak


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Foxy
 Foxy
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@dronebot-workshop

Put me down as interested.

  I just bought a few as learners and initially to add one to a 4X4 keypad.  The initial reaction: How do I mount it?? It comes with 4 mounting holes but they're to small for even a 2-56 screw.


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KK4EJ
(@kk4ej)
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Ive been using the NANO on several model railroad signal control modules as well as a monitor project for my geothermal heat pump. The modules are very solid and I find the built in USB makes it fast to adjust software. I connect via a RS485 interface and will add radio links to other projects coming. For a few bucks, its a great little board!

Randy


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Jabberwocky
(@jabberwocky)
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I'm using the NANO Every at the moment and it runs really well. I used my prototype code from the UNO (obviously compiled for the different processor) and it dropped straight on to it with no issues. Remapped all of my connections to the differently layout and everything worked perfectly.

My only concern is with the micro usb connection, if there is any strain on it then connections can be more easily broken to the module, but other than that it been fantastic.


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LinuxTech
(@linuxtech)
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@dronebot-workshop

Very correct sir,

The arduino nano is a such an arduino board, which keeps on upgrading time to time. So, whichever version of an arduinon nano we have, we can't be sure that it contains all the different types of radio communications

thank you


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DroneBot Workshop
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Posted by: @jabberwocky

My only concern is with the micro usb connection, if there is any strain on it then connections can be more easily broken to the module, but other than that it been fantastic

I absolutely hate micro-USB connectors, they are way too fragile. I like the mini-USB and the USB-C connectors.

 

Posted by: @kk4ej

Ive been using the NANO on several model railroad signal control modules as well as a monitor project for my geothermal heat pump. The modules are very solid and I find the built in USB makes it fast to adjust software. I connect via a RS485 interface and will add radio links to other projects coming. For a few bucks, its a great little board!

Sounds like some very interesting projects you have there!

Posted by: @foxy

I just bought a few as learners and initially to add one to a 4X4 keypad.  The initial reaction: How do I mount it?? It comes with 4 mounting holes but they're to small for even a 2-56 screw.

They are metric, not SAE.  I suspect that they are the M1.4 size, the same size you use to mount HC-SR04 Ultrasonic Sensors (which is why I now have a drawer full of them).

Sounds like this topic does have a lot of interest, so I'll put it on the list.

😎

Bill

 

"Never trust a computer you can’t throw out a window." — Steve Wozniak


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Foxy
 Foxy
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@dronebot-workshop

re: the "too fragile" micro-USB connector.

You absolutely must mount the nano board on a bit of a stand-off so that there is 3 or 4 mm clearance below the backside of the board.  The micro-USB plug (at least the one I'm using) is thick enough that it extends below the back of the board when plugged in and if there is not enough room for it, it will force the USB receptacle away from the board and break something.

KEN  


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DroneBot Workshop
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@foxy

I'm actually speaking of micro-USB connectors in general, not specifically the one on this board. 

I have a couple of phones and tablets that are now completely useless because the micro-USB connectors have worn out due to repeated use.  I now only purchase tablets and phones that can also be charged with a charging pad, already one of them needs to be charged that way because its micro-USB connector has failed.

The newer USB-C connectors seem much better, and they have the added advantage of being able to be inserted either way.

Your observation regarding the Nano board is interesting, and a good tip for those using the Nano. 

Of course on a microcontroller that you're building into a circuit permanently you probably won't use the USB connector that much anyway after you have it programmed, and if you do use it to power the board then you likely won't be unplugging it that much.  So for limited use, it's alright.

😎

Bill

 

"Never trust a computer you can’t throw out a window." — Steve Wozniak


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