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Which (if any) of these Python-related topics do you find interesting? Poll is created on Feb 16, 2021

  
  
  
  
  

Python, MicroPython, CircuitPython  

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Hal
 Hal
(@hal)
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Hi Bill,

I am interested in connecting various sensors to my data acquisition system (LabJack T7) and collecting data and processing the raw data.

For example, I have two CO2 sensors (Sunrise 1% CO2 Sensor  (SE-11) from co2meter.com) which came with a development kit and I would like to connect the kit output to my data acquisition board to collect concentration data.

Another sensor I would like to use is a flow measurement device (from Digikey).  Again I would like to connect that sensor to the DAQ system.  The flow sensor is Honeywell AWM90000 Series,   AWM92100V  SENSOR AIRFLOW 200 SCCM, the digikey product # is 480-2698-5-ND).

I am not sure how to wire these sensors to microcontrollers and have them communicate to the DAQ system yet. I would be very much interested in these topics.  I think an interpreter such as MicroPython is more practical for me. 

 

Regards, Hal

 

 


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SteveBr
(@stevebr)
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My preference would be Micropython so as not to be too focussed on whatever the product related features/ functions are and the specific anamolies created by Adapfruit.  Their stuff would work equally I expect when used with a standard micro python program, but not the other way around. Anyone know about that?  Also, for example I am looking forward to using a Maixduino  board which is really focussed on AI type work.  Taking advantage of the excellent long-standing Python libraries eg like Numpy/ Pandas/Matplotlib may be possible better with micro python. You can tell I don't know too much about that yet, but its just a thought.  


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TheOutlander
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So, I spent some time watching the Adafruit video and perusing MicroPython and CircuitPython. Since my "projects" are somewhat undefined and really about learning, I revised my previous answer 🙂 My Pico will love me. 

"Hardware eventually fails. Software eventually works." - Michael Hartung


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Boat Rocker
(@boat-rocker)
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I'm an in line C bit manipulator/programmer from way back and I resisted the OO "revolution" that, I felt (and still do), was adding unnecessarily convolution and bloating to the industry. I just couldn't get past the inherited descendant ancestor shenanigans that I just couldn't (perhaps, admittedly, through a lack of interest) tie off gracefully; It didn't seem complete and, thus, secure. Add interpreters and... no, just no.

This is just my opinion. It don't mean a thing. If it works for you, then nice. But no Python for me, thank you.

 

@sid

Yeah, I heard about XIAO, ordered a few, and Bill pops in with a video a couple of days after they arrive. And this isn't the only instance... ESP's, gyro/tilt sensors, and others over the years seemingly more often than not.

Bill is clairvoyant. Kind of spooky. Handy, useful, but spooky.

Thank you, Bill.


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noweare
(@noweare)
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@byron Great post, BTW


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Atle
 Atle
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To me, Python for microcontrollers is not that interesting, since C is a lot closer to the metal. (A presentation of C vs. assembly would glue me to the screen.)

However, once I get to the Raspberry Pi, or even more powerful SBCs that can run TensorFlow and the like, Python becomes very interesting.

Therefore, I'd like to know what Python IDEs you like best and why.


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howgre
(@howgre)
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As a complete novice regarding any form of Python, I'd appreciate any tutorials that would get me up and running. 

Despite there being a supposed wealth of information on the web regarding the topic, none of it seems to involve a traditional route of purchase/download software - install - get IDE going - write program - adapt program to own use.

Please don't direct me to the python.org website. I've already tried that.

With the continuing introduction of new microcontrollers that insist on some form of python, it's becomming increasing frustrating to be unable to do anything at all.

Any pointers would be welcome. I don't mind buying books, but scanning through what's available on Amazon just gives a lot of one star reviews for almost everything. For a language that's supposedly so easy to learn, it's proving anything but. C in the Arduino IDE may have all the charm of a cornered rat, but at least I can (just about) understand it, and Bill's explanations are exemplary.


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codecage
(@codecage)
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@howgre

And anyone else that is interested in learning Python, or learning more about Python, Paul McWhorter is starting a new series of YouTube tutorials on learning Python next week on Wednesday Feb. 24, 2021.  It premieres at 12:30PM EST (New York).  Each subsequent tutorial will be on Wednesday in the following week.  I think he has at least 25 lessons ready to be watched.

Give it a look-see.  Especially if you haven't stumbled across Paul's YouTube tutorials yet.

SteveG


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howgre
(@howgre)
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@codecage

Thanks for that. I’ll take a look.

i believe I’ve seen a couple of his YouTube videos. 

Howard


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Iserlohn
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@howgre

As a complete novice you may want to have a look in socraticas YT channel. They have a lot of stuff, search for python. They are verrry basic and they have their own style but I like them.


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byron
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Posted by: @howgre

With the continuing introduction of new microcontrollers that insist on some form of python

The only microcontoller board I know of that insists on micropython is the pyboard, and that was created by the creator of the micropython python derivative so thats understandable 😀.   All the other boards I have, from the likes of Adafruit or indeed the new rpi Pico can be programmed in C / C++ as well as having a micropython or ciruitpython ability.  But I suppose there may be some other microcontroller boards  I'm not aware of.

When it comes to learning to program in python my personal choice is the Corey Schafer youtube channel.  He has a lot of videos and you have to hunt for his starter series playlist.  

As for loading python and using an IDE you cant beat getting hold of a Raspberry pi, may be just a Raspberry pi Zero which is only a few pounds, and then using some of the Raspberry pi foundation getting started documents and books which you can download from their website.   This will take you from easily downloading the Rpi OS that includes python and will take you through creating your first python programs.   


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DroneBot Workshop
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Topic starter  
Posted by: @byron

The only microcontoller board I know of that insists on micropython is the pyboard, and that was created by the creator of the micropython python derivative so thats understandable 😀.

Actually, the pyboard can also be programmed in CircuitPython.

But I do understand what you are saying, I don't know of any way to use it with C++.

Posted by: @byron

As for loading python and using an IDE you cant beat getting hold of a Raspberry pi, may be just a Raspberry pi Zero which is only a few pounds, and then using some of the Raspberry pi foundation getting started documents and books which you can download from their website.   This will take you from easily downloading the Rpi OS that includes python and will take you through creating your first python programs.

That is a very good suggestion.

😎

Bill

"Never trust a computer you can’t throw out a window." — Steve Wozniak


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jfabernathy
(@jfabernathy)
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My son recommend at tutorial website that I find very useful for reference even after I've done the tutorial.  It has Python, Java, JSON, etc.

https://www.w3schools.com/python/default.asp

If your code won't compile, have another glass of bourbon. Eventual the problem will be solved.


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WhitneyDesignLabs
(@whitneydesignlabs)
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I agree. Excellent site. I use it for reference a lot while learning Java in my community college class.

Like: Python, Adept: C++, Don't like: Java


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DroneBot Workshop
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@jfabernathy

W3 Schools is one of the best resources on the web. What I really like about them is that they have interactive examples where you can edit the code in your browser and observe the results.

Great recommendation!

😎

Bill

"Never trust a computer you can’t throw out a window." — Steve Wozniak


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