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Raspberry Pi version

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Sumanta
(@sumanta)
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Which version of Raspberry Pi would you recommend a beginner?

By a beginner, I mean an individual,  who has worked a lot with the Arduino and is switching from Arduino to Raspberry Pi for the first time.


   
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Sumanta
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Posted by: @sumanta

Which version of Raspberry Pi would you recommend a beginner?

By a beginner, I mean an individual,  who has worked a lot with the Arduino and is switching from Arduino to Raspberry Pi for the first time.

P.S. I am not talking about Raspberry Pi Pico, because it's a microcontroller like Arduino.


   
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(@yurkshirelad)
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What do you intend to do with it?


   
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Sean451
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Posted by: @sumanta

Which version of Raspberry Pi would you recommend a beginner?

By a beginner, I mean an individual,  who has worked a lot with the Arduino and is switching from Arduino to Raspberry Pi for the first time.

Apples and oranges. The Arduino is a microcontroller that can be programmed for a specific task. The Raspberry Pi is an entire computer that can run a Linux-based OS to run many programs, just like any Windows or Apple OS machine. It's small, but it packs a punch.

The most recent version of the Pi is the Raspberry Pi 4 which starts around $35. You would, of course, need to add stuff to make it work. To that end, you can get a Canakit that comes with a Pi 4 with 8 gb of memory, a case, heatsinks, fan, power supply and hdmi connection for around $109 on Amazon.

There is also the Raspberry Pi 400 which built the motherboard into a keyboard. You can get that with mouse, power supply and hdmi connection for around $159 on Amazon. When I tell people they can get a real desktop computer for less than $200 they don't believe me.

I love my Pi.

--->Sean

(◕(' 人 ') ◕)


   
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noweare
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I would get the latest version of the pi.


   
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frogandtoad
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@sumanta

If the Pi4 is cheap enough for your location, go with that, otherwise go for a Pi3.

Cheers.


   
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Sumanta
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@yurkshirelad

Er... All those projects, which I will have done with the Arduino plus some hi-fi projects, which can only be made using the Raspberry Pi.


   
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Sumanta
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@sean451

Thanks for your suggestion. I will surely try it, when the correct time comes. 😀 


   
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Sumanta
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@noweare

Okay. But sometimes the latest versions might not comfort the newbies and have a steep learning curve. That's why I asked this question. Anyways, thanks for your suggestion too. 🙂 


   
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Sumanta
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@frogandtoad

Okay sir. I will go for Raspberry Pi 4, if it fits in my budget, along with all the peripheral parts.

Thanks for your reply. 😀 


   
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SuperCharlie
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There isn't really that big of a difference between the different models of raspberry Pi until you get to the Pico except for speed and better hardware. Each of them will run the basic raspbian operating system and has basically the same functionality except for a raspberry Pi zero which may or may not include Wi-Fi depending on which you pick.

Think of it more as picking a laptop and which one you would want to use. All of them are going to run the same OS basically. 64-bit is only on the 4 though I think..


   
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Sumanta
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Posted by: @supercharlie

There isn't really that big of a difference between the different models of raspberry Pi

Okay. Thanks for this information. 🙂 


   
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Sid
 Sid
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@sumanta

If you know to work around Debian or LINUX flavors, Raspberry Pi is a treat to work with. The difference that you will find (between PI and Arduino) is that unlike using just the programming environment for Arduino on normal Windows (where almost everything gets detected automatically these days), it can get tricky with PI - specially if you have never used Debian or LINUX/UNIX before. (I say this because I have worked as a Trainer for decades here in India, and I know, LINUX is not something that you, as a student, have an easy access to). So think about the extra learning curve as well in case you have no clue on LINUX. And if you are aware, there is nothing to beat the Debian. 🙂

Having that said, I personally have a Pi 3 (agreed specs are nowhere near any decent computer of today - 1GB RAM and a SD memory card to act as a Disk Drive) but I have used it as a computer for years. It is great at least in that aspect.

As for projects, well, initially, I had my Pi because I wanted to do some projects but when it arrived and I realized it could be used as a computer with Python and the Debian, I was more fascinated to using it as a computer. And then, when the time for Projects arrived (the lockdown gave me much free time), I already was learning Arduino which again has been a fascinating experience. Agreed, I have not done anything big or special, but the things I have here with me (I am talking of LEDs and WS2811s) I am more than happy.

I might have to move over to Pi as a controller once I determine if I can sync music with UNO or maybe some other Arduino (music controlled 8x8x8 NeoPixel LED Cube should be my last project with LEDs unless I decide to add a few more of these NEO Pixel projects to my list).

Life is exploring and learning


   
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Sumanta
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@sid

Wow!! Thanks for sharing your experience. 😀 

Posted by: @sid

If you know to work around Debian or LINUX flavors, Raspberry Pi is a treat to work with.

 

By the way, Raspberry Pi uses Raspbian as an OS, right?


   
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codecage
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@sumanta

"Raspian" was the name the RasPi folks used in the past to refer to the OS on the Raspberry Pi.  The have now changed to 'Raspberry Pi OS" but you will still here people using both names.  The OS is based on the Debian release of Linux, thus the similarities in the ending of the two names.

To add even more confusion to the mix, Raspian, had different code names for each release of the OS, like  Wheezy, Jessie, Stretch, & Buster.  Buster is the current version, the others are past versions. Just waiting to hear what the "code" name of the next version will be.  Anyone else heard anything yet?

SteveG


   
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