how to wire multipl...
 
Notifications
Clear all

how to wire multiple DC output from one power source ?

26 Posts
6 Users
16 Reactions
2,316 Views
Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7410
 

@ ddistrbd1 Could you show me the datasheet, NOT anything from AliExpress?

An LM2596 is a part, it doesn't matter who manufactures it like a tire of a certain size. It is a DC-to-DC converter, with NO AC involved. I am attaching pictures of the real module.

By definition, a Buck and a Boost, as well as a Buck/Boost converter are all DC to DC converters, a Buck reduces, a Boost increases, and a Buck/Boost is variable the output depending on the input plus the potentiometer setting.

Words like Buck, Boost, LM2596 have legal meanings, there are NOT more than 1 LM2596 designs in the world. Anybody can make one but legally they probably have to pay a copyright or patent fee to the inventor. You can't make a design you dream up and call it LM2596, that's not how it works. 

It's the same as a screw, if it is labelled as a #8 then you know ALL screws labelled #8 are the same size. The same is true of electronic parts, a diode labelled as a 1N4148 is a certain spec no matter who manufactures it. The same for a transistor called a SS8050, or a MOSFET called an IRF540N or a voltage regulator called LD1117V33.

Start at the datasheet, be supect of any letters or numbers added after the part number, they may be fake or may be real but if the only hits google finds are Ali then it's BS.

Your links to AliExpress are bogus!

IMG 7448

 

 

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
My personal scorecard is now 1 PC hardware fix (circa 1982), 1 open source fix (at age 82), and 2 zero day bugs in a major OS.


   
ReplyQuote
Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7410
 

@davee @ddistrbd1 AGH, I am still learning, I didn't realize this is a part vs board thing yet again. So it is plausible that there is an AC to DC version, but I would NOT recommend it for safety reasons and for technical reasons. Do whatever you want Ken, I am ignoring this topic now.

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
My personal scorecard is now 1 PC hardware fix (circa 1982), 1 open source fix (at age 82), and 2 zero day bugs in a major OS.


   
ReplyQuote
(@ddistrbd1)
Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 44
Topic starter  

Posted by: @zander

@ ddistrbd1 Could you show me the datasheet, NOT anything from AliExpress?

An LM2596 is a part, it doesn't matter who manufactures it like a tire of a certain size. It is a DC-to-DC converter, with NO AC involved. I am attaching pictures of the real module.

By definition, a Buck and a Boost, as well as a Buck/Boost converter are all DC to DC converters, a Buck reduces, a Boost increases, and a Buck/Boost is variable the output depending on the input plus the potentiometer setting.

Words like Buck, Boost, LM2596 have legal meanings, there are NOT more than 1 LM2596 designs in the world. Anybody can make one but legally they probably have to pay a copyright or patent fee to the inventor. You can't make a design you dream up and call it LM2596, that's not how it works. 

It's the same as a screw, if it is labelled as a #8 then you know ALL screws labelled #8 are the same size. The same is true of electronic parts, a diode labelled as a 1N4148 is a certain spec no matter who manufactures it. The same for a transistor called a SS8050, or a MOSFET called an IRF540N or a voltage regulator called LD1117V33.

Start at the datasheet, be supect of any letters or numbers added after the part number, they may be fake or may be real but if the only hits google finds are Ali then it's BS.

Your links to AliExpress are bogus!

-- attachment is not available --

 

 

Unfortunately I do not have the datasheet , everything I have shown is in fact from Aliexpress,

 you can always type the following in the search window on Aliexpress and verify my links.

BTW, I find Dave 's explanation  most reasonable.

I don't think you are convinced but that's ok, , I gave all the info I could muster , whether they sound unreasonable  or bogus I can't do anything about it I'm sure you agree. 

I sincerely appreciate the time you and others spend with newbies, it is commendable .

 

Ken from Peterborough


   
ReplyQuote
Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7410
 

@ddistrbd1 You have the datasheet. I gave it to you. As I said, I got caught by the part # vs dev board confusion. Yes, Dave's explanation is correct.

Had you just done a Google of LM2596, the first hit is the Texas Instrument website. If you don't know, Texas Instrument is one of a handful of electronic parts manufacturers and designers. You need to learn which Google results are relevant. Fortunately, there are also websites that collect everyone's data sheets for your convenience. They will be recognizable by their name. Other manufacturers will also have this part in their inventory. Even in the tube days, each factory made tubes for other factories. I spent many a day behind the Westinghouse factory, climbing the pile of broken tubes, looking for one that survived. This is where I saw tubes with Sylvania or GE markings and learned that each factory made tubes for each other factory.

TIP: For inserting wires into those green terminal blocks use Wire Ferrule Connectors. I got a kit on Amazon from #8 to #22

Screenshot 2023 04 09 at 10.49.32

 

 

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
My personal scorecard is now 1 PC hardware fix (circa 1982), 1 open source fix (at age 82), and 2 zero day bugs in a major OS.


   
ddistrbd1 reacted
ReplyQuote
(@davee)
Member
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 1794
 

Hi Ron @zander, @ddistrbd1

  re: Words like Buck, Boost, LM2596 have legal meanings, there are NOT more than 1 LM2596 designs in the world. Anybody can make one but legally they probably have to pay a copyright or patent fee to the inventor.

I understand what you are saying, and while it is partly true, it is also oversimplifying the situation. Large manufacturers do indeed cross sell to each other, but that is only the tip of the iceberg.

Some designs will have patent protection, but that is limited to 20 years at the most, and certain countries have their own interpretation. Your description is probably correct for say Intel and AMD, as suppliers for processor chips for personal computers, but for more 'mundane' devices, the world is a lot more muddy. Even here, it only applies to the 'high end' models. The ubiquitous Intel 8051 processor design has been copied and reinvented countless times.

The majority of integrated circuits tend to rely on difficulty of copying, but that is only effective if it uses technology that is not 'readily available' .. and by 'readily available', I mean to governments, etc. with very deep pockets and power.

Devices like IN4148 or the well-known op-amps and logic families have been both cross copied with agreement between the manufacturers, not necesarily to identical specs, as well as third party copies. Hence, reputable manufacturers of  high integrity equipment will requalify their designs if they need to move to another supplier of nominally the same part. The chance of finding a problem is usually far too small for amateur hobbists like us to worry about, but if you are supplying a unit which is safety critical, the situation is different.

In reality, most of the copies are pretty close, sometimes to the annoyance of the company that first invented it, so using the first data sheet you can find with the same part number is often 'good enough' for amateur use, providing you are prepared to accept the small chance of an an unexpected failure or difference.

-----

But please remember,  there are some even more unscrupulous rogues around .. we have previously discussed the wondrous specifications of some lithium-ion batteries, and the same applies to some chips.

----------

You mention that "ALL screws labelled #8 are the same size" ... well some might be half an inch long, others six inches long ... and I am sure you will find some that are fractionally undersize, and feel sloppy in the nut, whilst other batch feel a bit 'tight', assuming it was a machine screw, as against a wood screw, self-tapper, etc.   Plus, if you bought them in Europe, there is a fair chance their specification would actually be a 'metric size', and it could have any one of several different head designs ...  and so on... In fact, I had to do a quick Google to find out what size a #8 screw actually should be, as that sizing system is nearly extinct in the UK, except for exports to the US.

---------

So some common chips may indeed be like the #8 screw definition! 🤨

I advise caveat emptor in all cases.

Take care my friend, best wishes, Dave


   
ddistrbd1 reacted
ReplyQuote
(@ddistrbd1)
Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 44
Topic starter  

Posted by: @zander

@ddistrbd1

TIP: For inserting wires into those green terminal blocks use Wire Ferrule Connectors. I got a kit on Amazon from #8 to #22

 

 

That tip sounded too good to ignore. I  always wanted a set but never really had a need for it until now.

searched Amazon and got a kit  slightly different from yours, it covers 10AWG to 28AWG which covers all the gauges I work with.

Thank for the great tip.

 

Ken from Peterborough


   
ReplyQuote
Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7410
 

@davee Recall my little story of finding tubes from other manufacturers in the scrap pile. When I went to high school a few years later, our electronics class took a tour of that same Westinghouse factory. It was a short walk away. During the tour, I asked the tour guide why I found Sylvania and other non-Westinghouse brands in the scrap. He said it was impossible for one factory to make all the tubes, so each factory specialized in a few and then made them for all cooperating manufacturers. I have no idea if semiconductor chips are done the same way, but it seems likely.

As far as the #8 screw example, obviously, they come in different lengths and head styles, I am pretty sure you knew that. 

 

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
My personal scorecard is now 1 PC hardware fix (circa 1982), 1 open source fix (at age 82), and 2 zero day bugs in a major OS.


   
ReplyQuote
(@davee)
Member
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 1794
 

Hi Ron @zander,

 With semiconductors there is a huge cross subcontracting business .. indeed some well-known device 'manufacturers' are described as 'fabless' because they have no manufacturing capability at all.

Other manufacturers make similar devices, often using the same numbers, or very similiar numbers, either under licence or by designing functionally equivalent devices.

Best wishes, Dave


   
Ron reacted
ReplyQuote
(@cecil)
Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 44
 

I just looked in my 40 year old copy of Machinery's Handbook and it uses 8 pages of fine print to list all the #8 screws.  And those pages do not describe the various classes of thread, generally classes 1,2, and 3 with similar distinctions in the metric system, the various styles of thread, besides 60 degree there is Whitworth, Acme, square, butress, and the list goes on, or technical variations in pitch diameter or surface finish.

That was to take a break from soldering in Chineese protection diodes whose cathode stripes wear off after you touch them a couple of times.  So frustrating the way some penneys get pinched.

 


   
DaveE reacted
ReplyQuote
Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
Father of a miniature Wookie
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 7410
 

@cecil Just a coincidence that almost all the exceptions you mention are in the UK, where they start the measurement system with the diameter of a dead king's thumb. At least metric is rational.

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
My personal scorecard is now 1 PC hardware fix (circa 1982), 1 open source fix (at age 82), and 2 zero day bugs in a major OS.


   
ReplyQuote
(@cecil)
Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 44
 

@zander  Whether an old thumb or the original meter stick maintained by the French, both systems suffered from lack of a reliable constant in early years.  The wavelength of krypton 86 light solved that in the sixties and we've moved on from there.  

Of course the industrial revolution started in the UK.  Just as the Chineese use industrial espionage to get ahead today, the US, even before there was a US, used all sorts of subterfuge and theft to pry industrial secrets away from England and Scotland.  If we hadn't stolen high speed spinning technology from Scotland the famous New England textile industry would have never started and cotton from the South would still be for export only.

 


   
ReplyQuote
Page 2 / 2