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DroneBot Workshop
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Posted by: @koseyjason

Can anyone here recommend me an Arduino board to start with? Is the Raspberry 400 kit worth buying for a starter like me?

IMHO an Uno (or Uno clone) is still the best board to start with, as it's the most popular board and you'll find a few million articles and videos about using it.  I like the ones Elegoo makes as they label the connections on both the board and on the connector itself. Makes it a lot easier to figure out which pin is which, at least it does for an old guy like myself!

😊

If you want the Raspberry Pi to be simply a small desktop computer then the Pi 400 is a good deal. However, if your object is to LEARN how to use a Raspberry Pi and how to interface it with other devices then I would recommend using a Raspberry Pi 4 instead.  The Pi 400 can also be used for this of course, but again you'll find more information on using the standard Pi boards.

Plus, if you want to use either the video camera or video display connector then you're out of luck with the Pi 400.

😎

Bill

 

"Never trust a computer you can’t throw out a window." — Steve Wozniak


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koseyjason
(@koseyjason)
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Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 3
 
Posted by: @dronebot-workshop
Posted by: @koseyjason

Can anyone here recommend me an Arduino board to start with? Is the Raspberry 400 kit worth buying for a starter like me?

IMHO an Uno (or Uno clone) is still the best board to start with, as it's the most popular board and you'll find a few million articles and videos about using it.  I like the ones Elegoo makes as they label the connections on both the board and on the connector itself. Makes it a lot easier to figure out which pin is which, at least it does for an old guy like myself!

😊

If you want the Raspberry Pi to be simply a small desktop computer then the Pi 400 is a good deal. However, if your object is to LEARN how to use a Raspberry Pi and how to interface it with other devices then I would recommend using a Raspberry Pi 4 instead.  The Pi 400 can also be used for this of course, but again you'll find more information on using the standard Pi boards.

Plus, if you want to use either the video camera or video display connector then you're out of luck with the Pi 400.

😎

Bill

 

Hello Bill,

 

After few days of research, I have decided to go with a Raspberry Pi 4b 8GB. I chose the Raspberry Pi 4 because it has all the hardware (some of them which the Raspberry 400 doesn't have) so I can also experiment with cameras and displays.

 

As for the Arduino, I will purchase the Uno R3. As you mentioned, this guy is capable to do tonnes of stuffs.

 

I'll start my shopping list tonight. Thank you very much for your advise! 😎 

 

Jason


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Sid
 Sid
(@sid)
Trusted Member
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 73
 

@koseyjason

Welcome Aboard! 🙂

I purchased a Raspberry a few years ago. Reason -  I came across a few videos that used Raspberry Pi to do some electronic projects. But once I had it, I realized that this device is just not what it was shown as on those videos. Basically, Raspberry is a small computer in itself.  And it runs on Debian (which is a UNIX/LINUX kind of operating system with a Command Line mode as well as a GUI mode). And despite the fact that you can use it for microprocessor works, it is just one aspect.

So as days passed, I started using this device as a computer. It has Python and many other cool apps as well. Only demerit of the version that I have is the RAM and Storage. But nonetheless, it can connect to Internet/Wi-Fi, Monitor or HD Displays, Keyboards etc.

Arduino on the other hand, is a bare device that you can use to handle Microcontrollers - specially ATMEGA series (maybe I am wrong about it controlling only the ATMEGAs, but I am new to this as well). It needs some computer to write codes and upload onto it- yes, there are different ways and computer might not be required, but I am not sure if those would be easy or anything. At least, if you go without a computer, you will need something else (implying an extra purchase).

About working or buying an Arduino - Well, it is said that UNO is the best version for various reasons. However, As there are too many versions around, it would be better to assess what you need to do with your arduino. I mean, if you need to connect to internet, there are the WIFI enabled or even the Ethernet enabled versions of UNO around - however, even if you start off with a basic UNO, you can purchase a needed sheild later to suite your needs.

Life is exploring and learning


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Foxy
 Foxy
(@foxy)
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@rooster     & others

Current direction is defined by the IEEE  (Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers).  For a generator (rotating machine, battery, photovoltaic cell, any power supply etc.) current flows out of the positive terminal and into the negative terminal.  For a power consumer (light bulb, heater, motor, electronic circuit board or component etc.) current flows into the positive terminal and out of the negative terminal.  The fact that the current in a copper wire consists overwhelmingly of negatively charged electrons is irrelevant; in a semiconductor the current will be a mix of electrons flowing one way and "holes" (missing electrons) flowing the other way but this is also irrelevant.  And I admit it may be hard to get your head around this one.

If you just remember the definition, the other rules, right hand rule for magnetic fields etc fall into place.


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Rooster
(@rooster)
New Member
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 4
 

Tnx @Foxy...I really appreciate the answer.

I have taken the definition in and will definitely keep it in mind as I learn more.

Atm, as I have read more into my book Complete Electronics Self Teaching Guide, my best understanding falls in line with the definition you gave and also the response that @robotbuilder gave me.  Which, in my own words, is that they design the components (diodes for example) such that the current will run through it according to electron flow, but the anode and cathode, for example, are labled according to conventional flow.

Again, this is just my best guess atm...I'm sure my understanding will continue to evolve.  

Thanks again for your response 👍 


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Foxy
 Foxy
(@foxy)
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@rooster

Way back (60yrs) when I was working on a master's in "transistor electronics" we got into pnp and npn transistors and worried about current flow by electrons in n type material and holes in p type material but any more that's buried in the package doesn't attract much attention other than get the polarities right.  The main transistors then were 2n107 (pnp) and 2n170 (npn) both rated, as I remember it 10ma 10volts.  Times have changed.


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Rooster
(@rooster)
New Member
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Posts: 4
 

@foxy Wow, a master's in transistor electronics!  That is totally bad azz in my books...if only I had a do-over.

Talk about times have changed...I just got a Raspberry Pi 400 as a cheap PC and everything is so micro now, including the power usage...it's really cool.

Exciting times for sure.


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Foxy
 Foxy
(@foxy)
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@rooster

Don't get carried away!!

I also had to take a "miner" and chose control systems and ended up making a living in control systems design and barely touching the transistor electronics other than as it applied to control systems.  The moral is don't get super focused on one thing when getting an education   


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Foxy
 Foxy
(@foxy)
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Correction:   "miner" should have been spelled "minor".  Two completely different words with different meanings.  I hope no one was confused by this


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jBo
 jBo
(@jbo)
Active Member
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 14
 

Hi All, 

Good to see a thriving community of people interested in small electronic bits. I'm a retired programmer, and I very much realize saying "I did software" is a very general statement. Within that, my first "career" was real-time FORTRAN and assembler for oil well logging. Surprisingly, that low level coding is some of the most relevant to my current amateur interests in small computers and how they connect to the real world. I mean, working with one instruction set, I have a hardware multiply instruction, for instance, but that doesn't mean I can take it for granted on the next processor. So hooray for C on Arduino! My skills are rusty but improving.

I've enjoyed doing the experiments on Pi and Arduino. Beyond the little bit of coding, the major part is hands-on learning the electronics components and physical skills (soldering, assembly, etc) I either never knew as a child or barely understood. There are tons of videos available to help, and I've found dronebotworkshop.com to be the best, explaining, showing, doing.

I look forward to hearing about others' projects, and pushing forward on my own. I'm currently investigating adding a passive infrared sensor to a Sonoff Basic, an ESP8266 I think. I've seen videos about adding a reed switch to the Sonoff, to detect a door opening. However, I'm currently stumped about adding the PIR (HC-SR501), because it runs at 5V and the 8266 provides 3.3V.

 

Thanks,

John

This post was modified 2 months ago by jBo

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jBo
 jBo
(@jbo)
Active Member
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Posts: 14
 

@foxy - Ha! Words are so much fun 😆 


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jBo
 jBo
(@jbo)
Active Member
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 14
 

@dronebot-workshop

I would second that about using Arduino Uno or clone as a means of learning about small processors and how they can interact with the world. I'm pretty new, but have learned a lot. I came across Adafruit simply because they are so well known, and have so much good documentation, not to mention it's so easy to remember the company with the pink hair. Seriously, as I understood more about the Uno, and read the docs for it and the Adafruit Metro, either seemed a good choice. They're both "full-sized" for the Arduino standard. This is great, since bigger means easier for me to follow along and get things done with my stubby fingers. I didn't know about the Elegoo ones, but Bill's point about seeing those nicely labeled pins applies to me too. Second, the full size Uno and clones are compatible with those shields, add on boards that plug right on top and give you additional sensors or motor control or whatever. Good luck!


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jodinth
(@jodinth)
New Member
Joined: 2 months ago
Posts: 2
 

Hello, tricky to get in these days it seems, so I had better make myself familiar with you all.

 

I have a number of projects on the go, but all in draft stages, and so am looking (as a novice to the world of electronics) to iron out any mistakes I need not make before hand.


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Ulf Nilsson
(@ulf-nilsson)
New Member
Joined: 1 month ago
Posts: 1
 

Hi, Im from south of Sweden, and I have played around with electronics all my life (Im 62).

Started as a apprentice rewinding 3-phase motors as 16-year old, repairing all kinds of electric machines.

Started my own company -84, repairing everything from handrill to 5000ton hydraulic press.

Now days mostly repairing packagingmachines to foodindustry, (a lot cleaner 😉) .

Found Bill on Youtube, and I realy love his way of explaining how it works 😀 😀 

Hope to chat with you later, Im building a laser guided 7,5Kw concreatfloor grindingmachine, where I can control the 500mm grinding-disk up and down, and tree sensors to keep it accurate within 0,5mm. 😀 

I have a R-Pi and some cards with I2C, and a 7" display, looks nice. 🤩 

 

Uffe

 


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CNC Coops
(@cnc-coops)
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Joined: 1 month ago
Posts: 1
 

Good morning DroneBot forum members;
I am Ian Cooper - aka 'Coops'
I am nearing 60 and thought life would take on a more easier stance but how wrong could I have been!
till I have my hobbies and I thought it was about time I took the plunge and finally join something that would give me guidance and a platform to chat with other like minds.

I have been involved in mechanical engineering since I left school and love all things mechanical, I rebuilt my first car engine (with help from my dad) at the age of 14.
I have made many models of the plastic kind and have worked for the same company for close to 40 years. I am a CNC applications engineer, writing CNC code (G & M code) by hand, I am very much an old school engineer and as such struggle with the new tech (CADCAM) sometimes.
BUT,
That all about the future learning, keeps the brain active.

I tinker....... my wife hates me because I have so many on the go projects;

1. GWR 1950-1960 OO gauge model railway
2. Part built vertical CNC machine
3. A 3D printer, built but never ran (yet)
4. OpenHAB home automation system in build
5. Many Arduino projects (weather system, robot arm, etc)

The problem is I tend to loose focus, lol.

The main stay that keeps me going are my bikes;
I have 2 carbon fibre road bikes (winter & summer), 1 touring/cross bike, 1 MTB, 1 old skool mtb and a couple of steel bikes in strip-down rebuild stage.

I am looking forward to 2022 when I hang up my work boots and can devote more time to the list above.

Well that's me

ATB Coops 😎 

Today is the best day of your life, so live it!


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