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roman47
(@roman47)
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I want to remotely arm/disarm home security cameras (total 4) using either a switch located in remote location or a cellphone App (Blynk or similar).

 Here are requirements:

  1. A single momentary switch connected to Wi-Fi module should arm/disarm individual or all cameras using combination of short and long clicks for specific camera (Shelly i3).
  2. Each Wi-Fi module must reconnect to Wi-Fi router after AC power outage or Wi-Fi router outage.
  3. Each module must return to lasts on/off state after AC power outage.
  4. Each module must have an overheating protection (Shelly 1PM has +90C).
  5. Each module should receive power from a separate DC power supply located together with each module installed inside 120AC electrical box or wall cavity. Similar to Shelly modules.

The Shelly-1PM and Shelly-i3 smart modules provide all above functions plus control from Alexa and Goggle Assistant (very good but not essential feature). Shelly link https://shelly.cloud/knowledge-base/devices/

The main problem for all smart switches (Shelly, Sonoff, etc.)- they are designed to switch 100-240VAC up to 16A.

The security cameras need only 100VAC/10-50mA or even less.

Is it possible to use Shelly i3 module with custom built Wi-Fi to switch low power loads?

 Any suggestions or upcoming dronebootworkshop video? Thanks in advance

 

This topic was modified 2 weeks ago by roman47

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LydaRA
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I wonder if you are addressing the wrong "switch."  It might be easier to pass commands to your backbone networking switch.  Since the MACs of the cameras are static, you can set ACLs, VLANs, priorities, _exclusions_ etc.

This way the cameras retain a static configuration, and static power.  And everything can return to whatever "power on" state you desire.

This post was modified 2 weeks ago by LydaRA

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codecage
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Posted by: @roman47

they are designed to switch 100-240VAC up to 16A.

That is the maximum they can handle.  Running less current through them is just fine.

SteveG


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codecage
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@roman47

Guess I don't understand TRIACS or Shelly switches.  I thought those ratings were the max current handling capabilities of the "contacts" that open and close the circuit!

I guess my 120VDC 60ma teletype circuits and the relays we used didn't prepare me for today's gizmos! 🤣 

SteveG


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roman47
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Posted by: @codecage
Posted by: @roman47

they are designed to switch 100-240VAC up to 16A.

That is the maximum they can handle.  Running less current through them is just fine.

The Shelly 1PM as well as other similar switches use a TRIAC to switch AC load, I guess. You must have minimum current, normally 5-10mA through triac to close it. This current might deviate depending on individual triak switching characteristic. Connecting 12K resistor across load gives you 120V/12K=0.01A. 120V*0.01A=1.2W minimum, close to 2W. To be on save side minimum current should be 50mA. 120V/0.05A=2.4K 120V*0.05A=6W closest 10W. The heat must be dissipated inside close electrical box. All above is not acceptable for my application. A small mechanical relay instead of triac is the solution. The latching relay is better. It will remain in last state after power outage.

 


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roman47
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Posted by: @codecage

@roman47

Guess I don't understand TRIACS or Shelly switches.  I thought those ratings were the max current handling capabilities of the "contacts" that open and close the circuit!

I guess my 120VDC 60ma teletype circuits and the relays we used didn't prepare me for today's gizmos! 🤣 

Please review Shelly 1PM and i3 manuals in my original post


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LydaRA
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What has you wanting to turn cameras on and off?  If there is an urgent event that causes you to turn them on, you will miss a lot while they power up, POST, connect Wi-Fi, start the stream, etc...  Many security systems stream constantly, and let the NVR buffer & trigger.  I usually set motion-triggered recordings, with 5-10 seconds prior to trigger until 5-10 seconds after calm retained.  Some newer cameras can buffer internally--but only if they are continuously powered up.  The power draws you describe are minimal.  And if using "smart" cameras, the networking traffic is negligible until there is motion to be viewed.  It is generally free to have a network switch drop packets until desired.

The police cannot catch someone based upon a recording that starts with the shattered glass of the back door already on the ground when the video starts...


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roman47
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Posted by: @lydara

I wonder if you are addressing the wrong "switch."  It might be easier to pass commands to your backbone networking switch.  Since the MACs of the cameras are static, you can set ACLs, VLANs, priorities, _exclusions_ etc.

This way the cameras retain a static configuration, and static power.  And everything can return to whatever "power on" state you desire.

I do not have any networking switches and can't disable camera's feature though software. Please give more explanation on your solution.

All I want is to turn on/off 120VAC to camera's DC power supply. The ESP8266 or ESP32 modules can provide all requirements including Alexa

(

).

Of course, if Mr. Bill would be king enough to create a video, it would be the best answer. 


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LydaRA
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@roman47  Are your cameras going peer-to-peer, directly?  Or are they connecting to a Wi-Fi access point/router/switch? 

Yes, notice I included describing the Wi-Fi host as a router and as a switch.  While these may or may not have a bunch of RJ45 ports for cabled connected devices beyond your ISP's feed, they all _do_ handle traffic routing rules.  Some are more simplistic and some are more complicated, but they all have an interface for programming. 

Look at the sticker on the Wi-Fi host, it may list an IP and credentials.  If not, then open your Wi-Fi client computer and look at the IP settings.  The DHCP server will probably be the Wi-Fi host.  Either way obtained, open this IP address in a web page.  Have fun exploring...

This post was modified 2 weeks ago 2 times by LydaRA

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roman47
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Posted by: @lydara

@roman47  Are your cameras going peer-to-peer, directly?  Or are they connecting to a Wi-Fi access point/router/switch? 

Yes, notice I included describing the Wi-Fi host as a router and as a switch.  While these may or may not have a bunch of RJ45 ports for cabled connected devices beyond your ISP's feed, they all _do_ handle traffic routing rules.  Some are more simplistic and some are more complicated, but they all have an interface for programming. 

Look at the sticker on the Wi-Fi host, it may list an IP and credentials.  If not, then open your Wi-Fi client computer and look at the IP settings.  The DHCP server will probably be the Wi-Fi host.  Either way obtained, open this IP address in a web page.  Have fun exploring...

All modules are controlled through Wi-Fi router. No RJ-45 ports are used. I want to use ECP2286 or ESP32 or other controllers to create modules which will do the same function as Shelly 1PM and Shelly i3 modules.

The equivalent of Shelly i3 module (host) will send and repeat sending on/off commands to remote equivalent of Shelly 1PM module (client) until client acknowledges back that the on/off command was received and successfully completed.

That is all I need to start with. I'm looking for practical advice and/or existing application on above subject. The consequences of disabling cameras were thought trough and accepted. Thank you for responce.  

This post was modified 2 weeks ago by roman47

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Spyder
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@roman47

If Alexa is an option, you could use one of those Alexa power outlet wallwart devices, or a Raspi with a 4 relay HAT, or, I think the ESP32Cam has a low power option, to, not exactly "turn off", but, at least low power enough to kill the camera


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roman47
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Posted by: @spyder

@roman47

If Alexa is an option, you could use one of those Alexa power outlet wallwart devices, or a Raspi with a 4 relay HAT, or, I think the ESP32Cam has a low power option, to, not exactly "turn off", but, at least low power enough to kill the camera

All power outlet switches use a TRIAC to switch AC load, I guess. You must have minimum current, normally 5-10mA through triac to close it. This current might deviate depending on individual triak switching characteristic. Power to camera must be completely turn off and on to allow proper controller reset and re-connection to network. Therefore, "not exactly "turn off", but, at least low power enough to kill the camera" will not work. Also most outlet switches, except Shelly, do not restore last state and to bulky. Thank for suggestion.

 


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Spyder
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@roman47

Obviously I'm not understanding some part of your problem

Could you connect the power supply of the ESP to an Alexa power socket ?

The socket turns on, and the ESPCam starts up. It would always default to "ON" rather than "Last State", but, if you want OFF, just have Alexa turn off the power socket. Or do you want the ESP to also control something in addition to the camera ?

If so, have the relay HAT connected to a raspi, which powers the ESP, then a second relay on the HAT could control whatever extra device you need controlled


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roman47
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Posted by: @spyder

@roman47

Obviously I'm not understanding some part of your problem

Could you connect the power supply of the ESP to an Alexa power socket ?

The socket turns on, and the ESPCam starts up. It would always default to "ON" rather than "Last State", but, if you want OFF, just have Alexa turn off the power socket. Or do you want the ESP to also control something in addition to the camera ?

If so, have the relay HAT connected to a raspi, which powers the ESP, then a second relay on the HAT could control whatever extra device you need controlled

I have explained in my posts why power sockets will not work. Please review my posts.


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byron
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Posted by: @roman47

The Shelly 1PM as well as other similar switches use a TRIAC to switch AC load, I guess. You must have minimum current, normally 5-10mA through triac to close it.

I don't know about the Shell1PM, but the Shelly1 does not need to have any load on its 'switched' circuit to enable its 'power' circuit to switch the switched circuit on or off.   

The Shelly1 has a power circuit driven by 100-240V AC or 20-50V DC, or 12v DC.  The power circuit can be triggered to switch the 'switched' circuit via its wireless network connections with mqtt or http commands.  The power and switched circuits are isolated from each other and can be at different voltages.

The switched circuit can be an AC load of up to 240v AC at 16A, or some other low DC voltage circuit.  The switched circuit of the Shelly1 can be switched on or off regardless of whether any actual connections are made to its terminals.  (of course the Shelly1's power circuit will need to be connected to an appropriate power source.)

Edit: For completeness I will add that the Shelly1's power consumption is < 1W.

This post was modified 2 weeks ago by byron

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