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Garage lighting and parking sensor project

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TASan
(@tasan)
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@inq Re the power supply answer 

Hmm, seems I have to think about that and buy some new stuff. I can use the one I have for supervised testing and prototyping.

I should probably buy both the power supply and LED strips from a local Norwegian dealer. Much cheaper shipping, easier returns and guaranteed CE marked equipment.

Interested in learning about electrical engineering!


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
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@tasan Just addressing the fixation you have over solder. Almost EVERY part in all your electronic devices is soldered. My solar wires that are a 1/2 inch in diameter are not, but that is common sense. Where is the cutoff where you stop using solder and start using crimps, I don't know but your project probably will not come anywhere close. BTW, you say you want to learn some engineering, this is a good place to start but be aware that I doubt very many if any of us on the forum give this 'can I solder this' a thought because we are dealing with micro, milli and sometimes amps. The motors and other heavy draw devices (up to say 10Amps) get heavier wires and may be soldered or crimped depending on the mechanical connectors being used. Those connectors are picked not just because it's 10A, but generally for the convenience of connecting the wires. We use all kinds of connectors, from dupont to screw blocks to JST. They all have different power limitations and we seldom need to be concerned. My soldering station was one of the first things I bought when I decided to get back into electronics, otherwise how do I build anything? Depending on how deep you want to get, you may want a combo iron and hot air or seperate and with or without smoke extractors. Check reviews and ratings for soldering stations, there are a few well reviewed brands, the rest are knock offs of dubious quality.

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
Sure you can learn to be a programmer, it will take the same amount of time for me to learn to be a Doctor.


   
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TASan
(@tasan)
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@zander Thanks for the guidance 😊

Interested in learning about electrical engineering!


   
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robotBuilder
(@robotbuilder)
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@zander 

 

that supply is a 2A supply, not very high.

I read it as 24v 8A 200W supply?
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GFD3FQ4?psc=1&ref=ppx_pop_dt_b_product_details

@tasan wrote that he is splitting a 75W LED strip into 4 sections.
Shouldn't there be an electronic fuse to turn the transformer off should it exceed a certain current output?

 


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
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@robotbuilder I got that rating off the picture that was posted yesterday. There is a lot of confusion in this topic.

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
Sure you can learn to be a programmer, it will take the same amount of time for me to learn to be a Doctor.


   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
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@robotbuilder Here is the strip he posted https://amz.run/6Cv6  and here is some text from that link

And the DC24V2A power supply 

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
Sure you can learn to be a programmer, it will take the same amount of time for me to learn to be a Doctor.


   
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robotBuilder
(@robotbuilder)
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@zander 

Here is the strip he posted ...

Not the one he provided that I was able to access.

Confusion indeed with the silly Amazon thing which for some reason shows up in my last post???

This is what I saw,

powerSupply

   
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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
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Joined: 3 years ago
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@robotbuilder Not at all what I saw, I don't see the special encapsulated LEDS in that picture. The OP needs to clarify. @tasan

First computer 1959. Retired from my own computer company 2004.
Hardware - Expert in 1401, and 360, fairly knowledge in PC plus numerous MPU's and MCU's
Major Languages - Machine language, 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PL/I and PL1, Pascal, Basic, C plus numerous job control and scripting languages.
Sure you can learn to be a programmer, it will take the same amount of time for me to learn to be a Doctor.


   
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 Foxy
(@foxy)
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Posts: 56
 

@robotbuilder 

re:

--------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Current (amps) = Force (volts) x Resistance (ohms)

It is the power you pay for.  Watts per unit of time.

--------------------------------------------------------------------

1/ The correct formula is Current(amps) = Force(volts) / Resistance(ohms)

2/ You pay for energy in watt*hours or kwh (kilowatt hours) 

Mixups between power and energy may sound like a niggling difference but boy!! you should see the confusion it causes

This post was modified 1 year ago by Foxy

   
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robotBuilder
(@robotbuilder)
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@foxy 

Sorry @tasan a silly mistake. I did know the correct formulae it was late at night and I wasn't thinking clearly or at all!

And also thank you @foxy for the clarification on power another misleading statement I made without thinking.

It has been a long time since I attempted to teach myself basic electronics. For decades it was just hobby level programming after my last electronics project back then soldering up a computer kit but that is no excuse. Danger of not having been in the industry itself, just a hobby, not related in any way with how I earned my living over those many decades.

Thankfully we have some experts on the forum.


   
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TASan
(@tasan)
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Joined: 1 year ago
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Topic starter  

To clarify the power supply, it's indeed an 8A supply. But I have decided to just use this for testing and prototyping. I am going to buy new strips and a new power supply from a Norwegian supplier 🙂

Safety first!

Interested in learning about electrical engineering!


   
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(@e-danil)
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I would recommend adding some normal white strips as the brightness of RGBW lights are low. I guess the 75w means all the four lights glowing at full brightness

 

This post was modified 1 year ago by E.Danil

   
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Fritigern
(@fritigern)
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@robotbuilder Sorry, but Ohm's Law says V=-IR, so I= V/R. In other words Current is Voltage divided by Resistance.

Fritigern


   
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Fritigern
(@fritigern)
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Again sorry, the previous correction and apology didn't appear before I posted mine.


   
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