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How do you feel about Beginners-Level content? Poll is created on Dec 23, 2020

  
  
  
  

[Sticky] Beginners Level Material - Your Opinion Please!

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Will
 Will
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@zander 

Basically they say that the current flowing IN to a junction must equal the current flowing OUT of the junction. Also, the sum of voltages fed into a system must equal the voltages "consumed" by the system.

Nowadays it's common sense 🙂

https://isaacphysics.org/concepts/cp_kirchhoffs_laws?stage=all

Experience is what you get when you don't get what you want.


   
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Ron
 Ron
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@will Maybe that's why I never heard of it, it's just common sense unless you believe in magic.

Arduino says and I agree, in general, the const keyword is preferred for defining constants and should be used instead of #define
"Never wrestle with a pig....the pig loves it and you end up covered in mud..." anon
My experience hours are >75,000 and I stopped counting in 2004.
Major Languages - 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PLI/1, Pascal, C plus numerous job control and scripting


   
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Will
 Will
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Posted by: @zander

@will Maybe that's why I never heard of it, it's just common sense unless you believe in magic.

It was presented to us in our first high school class as a way of confirming that everything had to add up to zero in every circuit. It wasn't obvious to us then as it was our introduction to electricity.

As an aside, in Grade 11 Physics I was partnered with a girl (who knew nothing about science) to build a small circuit to demonstrate something. She picked up a red wire and asked me (seriously) if she'd get a shock if she touched both ends at the same time. I told her no, she wouldn't but to be extra careful with the black wires 🙂

Experience is what you get when you don't get what you want.


   
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Ron
 Ron
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@will You were a smooth operator even back then.

Arduino says and I agree, in general, the const keyword is preferred for defining constants and should be used instead of #define
"Never wrestle with a pig....the pig loves it and you end up covered in mud..." anon
My experience hours are >75,000 and I stopped counting in 2004.
Major Languages - 360 Macro Assembler, Intel Assembler, PLI/1, Pascal, C plus numerous job control and scripting


   
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Inst-Tech
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@hayttom agree with you about the skill level idea..this would help the beginner to customize their individual learning curve, so to speak.

Great idea!

Regards, LouisR

 

LouisR


   
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messyworkbench
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For context I am very much a beginner. I would be very interested in learning the fundamentals so that I have an understanding of the basics. Even going as far back as high school physics to build an understanding of the principles and math. I feel that this would be helpful. It would be a major undertaking and would require a huge amount of effort. I have gone to numerous sites to improve my understanding but I have found few that have a good flow through the incremental steps. Once the fundamentals are understood then I feel that the programming challenge would be more of "learning the vocabulary" and not having to teach both what is being done at the same time as how to do it.  My 2 cents for what it is worth.


   
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Don
 Don
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I'm fairly new to the Workshop and I've been working my way through many of the videos. Aside from the use of current limiting or pullup resistors, I can't recall seeing any other passive components being used, maybe the occasional capacitor. So it's hard to see why the site should devote much time to such things as Ohm's and Kirchhoff's laws. These concepts become useful if one is designing circuits from the scratch which is not the case in the broad ranges of topics covered by the Workshop.

Since microcontrollers are digital devices, some basic videos on digital electronics would be useful and these already exist. There are already videos on Digital Logic, the 555 Timer, Shift Registers, and other basic building blocks.


   
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Inst-Tech
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@donpk While you make a good point about passive components.. the basics are useful for troubleshooting purposes, and apply to simple circuits as well as the more complex circuits.. Without understanding Ohms law, Kirchhoff's, Norton's, and Thevenin's , it would be very difficult to troubleshoot even basic circuits..and the reason why many beginners have trouble making the projects work when a component is bad, out of tolerance, and just connected up wrong. That's my two cents worth, and as a matter of practical demonstration, I had plenty of electricians, in an industrial setting that couldn't troubleshoot a simple two wire 4-20 mA instrument loop, because they didn't understand the basics. These were people with 20 + years of experience in their jobs as electricians, but soon learned that instrumentation and basic electronics was far different that just wiring up a motor, relays, and switches.  

LouisR


   
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frogandtoad
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Posted by: @donpk

So it's hard to see why the site should devote much time to such things as Ohm's and Kirchhoff's laws. These concepts become useful if one is designing circuits from the scratch which is not the case in the broad ranges of topics covered by the Workshop.

In which video was this?
Can you please provide the link?


   
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Don
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@frogandtoad

In which video was this?
Can you please provide the link?

I'm not sure which videos you're asking about. I link to several videos at the end of my comment.

 


   
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frogandtoad
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@donpk

Posted by: @donpk

So it's hard to see why the site should devote much time to such things as Ohm's and Kirchhoff's laws. These concepts become useful if one is designing circuits from the scratch which is not the case in the broad ranges of topics covered by the Workshop.

Posted by: @donpk

@frogandtoad

In which video was this?
Can you please provide the link?

I'm not sure which videos you're asking about. I link to several videos at the end of my comment.

The ones that relate to: Ohm's and Kirchhoff's laws, if they were provided?


   
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Don
 Don
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@frogandtoad 

Perhaps I'm misunderstanding your question, but here is the result of a Google search for videos on Ohm's and Kirchoff's Laws.


   
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peterar
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Posted by: @frogandtoad

@donpk

Posted by: @donpk

So it's hard to see why the site should devote much time to such things as Ohm's and Kirchhoff's laws. These concepts become useful if one is designing circuits from the scratch which is not the case in the broad ranges of topics covered by the Workshop.

Posted by: @donpk

@frogandtoad

In which video was this?
Can you please provide the link?

I'm not sure which videos you're asking about. I link to several videos at the end of my comment.

The ones that relate to: Ohm's and Kirchhoff's laws, if they were provided?

While I can appreciate that folks love the format, style, competency of DroneBot Workshop Forum, please note that there are literally dozens of clear, competent videos of many very introductory electrical / electronics topics available for free. Please do Google-Search for them; you may feel overwhelmed a bit by the number of hits you get, and frustrated somewhat as you wander through them to find just the right personality and level of presentation --but it will be worth your time because you will learn, and you will find other personalities who seem to be able to produce great videos on more than one tiny topic. 

Personally, I'm pleased and happy for Bill to spend his time and talents producing his own great tutorials on and introductions to whatever his sense of balance, his interests at the moment, can spare and provide.

(I know. Bill invited us to suggest topics, and I respect that too. But with our suggestions all over the electronics map, it seems to suggest that anything that Bill offers up next will be very welcome by many of his subscribership.)


   
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Codeslinger
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@frogandtoad I have been poking around a lot on YouTube since I joined this thread.  I agree with the sentiment that has been expressed recently that this is probably not within the focus of the channel and that it would be redundant to what is already available from other sources.  There are several other channels that cover a lot of this very well. 

If you want to learn about soldering techniques and the basics of the hardware, I would recommend the learnelectronics channel. If you want to delve into the theoretical end just a little a bit, I would suggest AddOhms or EEVBlog in order of lighter to heavier theory. 

If you want to jump in with both feet and get the full treatment without the higher math but only the basic equations of the various laws of electronics, then I highly recommend the RSD Academy channel.  I have been going through one or two a day and am learnng about all of the things that I need to go back and double check in a circuit that I have been designing. I wish I had had access to that when I was doing battle with electricity and magnetism in my brief time as a physics major.

There are many others that I have used for videos on specific topics but I omitted them either to keep the list small, or to not include niche channels or those which have not been active for years and have no current videos. If you need any of thos, it is easy enough to find them on your own.


   
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stevenr8062
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You can definitely get lost on YouTube trying to learn basic electronics, even trying to Google it can be overwhelming, which can be very non-productive in the learning process. One of the sources I still use is linked below. Great step by step pages any level and great support via their forum.  That my two cents worth.

 

https://www.allaboutcircuits.com/


   
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