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Measuring Air Quality with ESP32 & Arduino


DroneBot Workshop
(@dronebot-workshop)
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Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 1114
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Use an ESP32 or Arduino to measure the quality of the air you breathe! Today, we'll work with several air quality sensors.

Pollution is a problem that affects everyone, no matter where they live. Even if you reside in a rural area, you are still subject to many types of pollution, both outdoors and inside your home.

Today we will look at several air quality sensors that you can use with a microcontroller. We’ll test them out using both an ESP323 and an Arduino, and we’ll also compare the readings to a commercial air quality meter to see if there is any correlation between readings.

We’ll be taking a look at the following sensors:

- MQ Gas Sensors (various models).
- PMS5003 PM2.5 Particulate Matter Sensor.
- BME280 Temperature, Humidity & Air Pressure Sensor.
- BME680 Temperature, Humidity & Gas Sensor.
- AHT20 Precision Temperature & Humidity Sensor.
- CCS811 Air Quality Sensor.
- SGP30 Air Quality Sensor.
- SGP40 Air Quality Sensor.

We’ll see how they work and what parameters they can measure, and we’ll hook them up and run a demo.

Then we’ll put a bunch of sensors together on an ESP32 to make an environmental monitoring platform.

Here is the Table of Contents for today's video:

00:00 - Introduction
01:38 - Air Quality
03:36 - Look at sensors
05:12 - Sensor Calibration Issues
06:46 - MQ Sensors Intro
12:25 - MQ Sensors Library & Code
16:42 - MQ Sensors ESP32 Considerations
21:00 - PM2.5 Sensors
27:55 - Temperature & Humidity Sensors Intro
31:25 - BME280 Demo
33:28 - BME680 Demo
35:49 - AHT20 Demo
37:33 - Air Quality Sensors Intro
39:40 - CCS811 Demo
43:09 - SGP30 Demo
45:38 - SGP40 Demo
47:36 - ESP32 Multi-Sensor
58:45 - Conclusion

On a personal note, this project actually alerted me to several areas in my home that I need to improve the air circulation in. Hopefully, you will find it equally useful!

Bill

"Never trust a computer you can’t throw out a window." — Steve Wozniak


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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 3046
 

Is there any reason why the PICO could not be used to replace both the UNO and ESP32? Of course I assume an external 5V supply. Another viewer suggested the ADS1115 could be used to resolve some level issues as well.

It is considered poor judgement to traverse a chasm in 2 leaps.


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DroneBot Workshop
(@dronebot-workshop)
Workshop Guru Admin
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 1114
Topic starter  

@zander A Pico would work just fine, as would pretty well any microcontroller.

😎

Bill

"Never trust a computer you can’t throw out a window." — Steve Wozniak


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Ron
 Ron
(@zander)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 3046
 

@dronebot-workshop Great, a PICOW with the AQ data on a web page seems like an obvious extension of the project.

It is considered poor judgement to traverse a chasm in 2 leaps.


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