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Arduino Uno to ATmega328 - Shrinking your Arduino Projects

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codecage
(@codecage)
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@sumanta

The voltage regulator steps the voltage in the range of 7-12V down to 5V, or so close it does not matter.  4.96V is only 4/100th of a volt below 5V so is completely acceptable.  I'm still wondering where you are getting the 4.96V figure.  If it is something you measured it could be an error in the device doing the measuring.  If you measured 4.96V and the meter you are using isn't 100% calibrated in a standards laboratory, and most aren't, it isn't necessarily accurate.  The voltage could really be 5.15V (just picking a number out of the air). But even that is fine.

Now that I've expended that much breath, 4.96V is totally fine as far as the Arduino and its ATmega328 chip is concerned.

SteveG


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Sumanta
(@sumanta)
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@codecage

Okay. Thanks for the confirmation. 🙂 

I found this figure, from the topic about the "Breadboard power supply". There, the forum members were saying, that the voltage regulators step down the voltage to 4.96V and not 5V. That's why I asked this question. 😀 


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codecage
(@codecage)
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@sumanta

I think in that case they were referring to a particular one or two breadboard supplies and possibly to a measurement they had made with a meter that wasn't very accurate.  The point is a 5V regulator takes the input voltage and outputs at 5V.  It doesn't really matter if that voltage is actually 4.96V or 5.04V (or anything else close to 5V) it's close enough.

As an example, if you look at a clock and it's still 30 seconds to 5 o'clock (430) and someone asks you what time it is, aren't you going to answer 5 o'clock not 30 seconds to 5 o'clock?

SteveG


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Sumanta
(@sumanta)
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Posted by: @codecage

(430) and someone asks you what time it is, aren't you going to answer 5 o'clock not 30 seconds to 5 o'clock?

Yes. That's right. 😉 


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Portersmith
(@portersmith)
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Can you do the same for the Arduino Mega, and if so, what is the chip they used for it?


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DaveE
(@davee)
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Hi @portersmith,

  Arduino range is briefly described at https://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/Products, which includes a click link to "Older boards", for those no longer in production by Arduino (which includes the Mega), whilst the Mega2560 is in the current list.

Looking and clicking there, you will see the original Mega used the ATmega1280 , whilst the current Arduino Mega 2560 uses the ATmega2560. If you bought one recently, it is more likely to be the 2560, but looking at the board is the only safe way to determine.

As for your question:

Can you do the same..?

Sorry, I am not clear exactly which thing you are trying to the same.

As this thread is from one of Bill's excellent videos, this maybe 'out of scope', I recommend you start a new thread in an appropriate section, describing precisely what you are wondering is possible.

Best wishes and good luck, Dave


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